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Saturday, November 19 • 8:00am - 9:10am
Redesigning Leadership Preparation Programs

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Participants:

The K-12 District as a Knowledge Organization: Challenging University Leadership Preparation Programs. Jack Leonard, Rachel Elizabeth Hoffman (University of Massachusetts- Boston)

We investigated a small urban school district with a high number of doctoral graduates
to better understand leadership development and the rationale for advanced education. Through document analysis and personal interviews, this case study uncovered an elaborate leadership development strategy, which was organic rather than mechanistic, distributed rather than hierarchical, focusing on intellectual capital rather than degrees and licensure, and district-centric rather than university-centered. The model raises questions about traditional programs in educational administration.

Redesigning a Principal Preparation Program Through School District Parternships. Rosalinda Hernandez, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; Roberto Zamora, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; Maria Banda Roberts, Texas A&M-Texarkana

The paper describes a mixed methods approach on the process of redesigning a principal preparation program. The superintendents and graduate students participated in group focus meetings and surveys, respectively, where various strengths and weaknesses in
the delivery of the program were identified. The graduate survey results indicated low satisfaction ratings in principal preparation in the three domains as the program currently existed. The study proposes a model for redesigning principal preparation programs based on the findings.

Preparing Principals: What Is Still Missing in Perceived Principal Leadership in Diverse School Contexts? Elson Szeto, Education University of Hong Kong; Annie Yan-Ni Cheng, Hong Kong Institute of Education

Schools change into complex and diverse contexts. Newly-appointed principals (NAPs) face leadership challenges in such contexts after completing a licensure programme. This proposal addresses the gap between the NAPs’ perceptions of leadership role in schools and social justice leadership as revealed in the literature. The findings are that enacting social justice leadership role is missing in the NAPs’ perception to address socially-unjust issues of equal and equitable learning for all students in diverse school contexts.

Challenges and Changes in Principal Preparation: Voices From the Field. Sonya Diana Hayes, Louisiana State University; Beverly Irby, Texas A&M University

The traditional university principal preparation program is the primary system for grooming aspiring principals to be leaders of teaching and learning. Through this phenomenological study, we provide valuable insight into the experience of university principal preparation faculty and their perception on the challenges in preparing principals for the role of instructional leader and what changes they feel need to be made in principal preparation programs to better prepare campus leaders for instructional leadership.

Leading for Justice: Insights From Student, Parent, Community, and School Stakeholders for a Principal Preparation Program. Gwendolyn Baxley, Colleen A. Capper (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

This study explores the dispositions, knowledge, and skills principals need to lead for justice and equity as part of their leadership preparation program—from the perspective of students, parents, community, and school practioners. Critical school practioners as well as students, families, and communities who are traditionally marginalized in school spaces offer perspectives that radically critique inequitable practices within schools and (re)imagine how school leaders are prepared to respond to their academic and social needs.




Saturday November 19, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

Attendees (13)