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Monday, November 14
 

8:00am

 
Tuesday, November 15
 

8:00am

 
Wednesday, November 16
 

9:00am

UCEA/BELMAS Research Collaboration: The International School Leadership Development Network
Research team members from the International School Leadership Development Network will meet to discuss research findings and future directions. Teams from around the world will: • Refine research designs for projects dealing with: (a) leadership for high need schools and (b) social justice leadership • Examine potential funding sources to support research projects • Establish plans for reporting findings at future professional conferences • Determine outlets for publishing research findings

Wednesday November 16, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

12:00pm

Graduate Student Summit Orientation
In this session, we will formally welcome all UCEA Graduate Student Summit (GSS) registrants to the 5th annual GSS. During this time you will have an opportunity to meet the members of the UCEA Graduate Student Council, learn about programming for graduate students at UCEA, and meet fellow graduate students. We will also honor outgoing members of the GSC during this time.

Wednesday November 16, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Columbus

1:00pm

1:10pm

GSS Session 1 - Ignite! - Collaborations and Partnerships: Bringing People Together
Participants: Educational Leadership Beyond School Walls: Engaging Immigrant Latino Families Through Learning from Community-Based Initiatives Elizabeth Gil, Michigan State University Educational leaders can tap into existing community-based ties of the increasingly diverse populations of students and families they serve. They can re-envision leadership by looking beyond school walls in order to better understand and connect with their schools’ students and families. This presentation encourages leaders to refresh practice by learning from effective practices community-based initiatives implement to engage their constituents, and invites leaders to redefine student success by considering holistic aspects of students’ schooling experiences. Ethnographic Case Study of Collaborative Leadership Structures Gregory R VanHorn, Ohio State University This ethnographic case study will expand current scholarship that explores how teams of teachers and administrators collaboratively increase their collective capacity to extend better learning opportunities for all students. The study will seek insights for educators to better understand how teams of teachers and administrators use student data, collaborative inquiry, and reflection to derive meaningful research-based teaching strategies in order to meet each student’s learning needs within sociocultural, organizational and situated learning environments. Understanding Faculty Laggards and Administrative Technologies Robert Benjamin Simon, Clemson University Universities spend an estimated eight billion dollars annually on information technology advancement, particularly enterprise software programs. However, there is a dearth of literature on the benefits of said innovations, which has forced managers to operate without proven strategies, and rely on inefficient communication strategies during implementations. This session will outline a qualitative study attempting to better understand those individuals least likely to adopt innovations, but to whom communication strategies should be tailored: laggards (Rogers, 2003). Cultivating Kinship:The Doctoral Student’s Role in a Successful Cohort Model Cori Canty Woessner, University of Denver; Rana T Razzaque, University of Denver; Tina Louise Goar, University of Denver; Mary Graft, University of Denver This presentation is a visually intriguing elicitation of how a cohort with strong ties has been impacted in its learning, resiliency and sense of community through its structure. Bandura’s social learning theory and Tinto’s framework of classrooms as communities are the guiding theoretical frameworks underlying this research. Audience members will understand their agency in creating connections among peers to further develop deep learning for themselves and others, and to support group efforts towards degree completion. Facilitator: James W. Koschoreck, Northern Kentucky University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

1:10pm

GSS Session 2 - Reshaping Dominant Structures within Schools
Participants: Persevering for “Our Kids”: Three African American Women Counternarratives Osly Flores, University of Pittsburgh For this paper, I situate the narrative of three African American female school principals and their leadership practices toward equity using a critical race theory framework. These three school leaders discuss educational issues that affect students of color and of low-socioeconomic status (SES). In addition, these three school leaders share the toll that occurs in working toward social justice. A Case Study of Intersection between Structure and Agency in Indonesia Asih Asikin-Garmager, University of Iowa The purpose of this study is to develop a theory on the relationship between existing structure and the principals’ leadership practices through the use of case study research for theory development. The overarching research question guiding this study is how does structure influence principals’ leadership practices? Preliminary data analysis indicate that government regulations and expectations delimit the leadership practices of the principal at Setia Budi school, leaving her little room to express her agency. Race in Elementary Science Classrooms: Implications for School Leaders Stefanie Marshall, Michigan State University This study utilizes Critical Race Theory (CRT) as a framework for analysis, provides insights concerning how one teacher engages with race in his elementary science classroom, aspects of the current educational policy scene that may contribute to the practices observed, as well as inform ways by which school leaders can support the capacity of teachers to address race in science classrooms. Revolutionizing Data Use in Schools: Student Use of Data in Personalized Learning Environments Alan Arthur Barnicle, University of Wisconsin-Madison Can the leadership tasks of data-driven instructional decision-making be shared with students? This paper presents evidence that school leaders and teachers are designing “personalized learning” environments to scaffold students in assuming these tasks – tasks which have traditionally been reserved for school leaders. Conferring between teachers and students emerges as an essential routine which, when paired with tools selected for collecting and making sense of data, builds student capacity to use data to inform instructional decisions. Facilitator: Colleen L. Larson, New York University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

1:10pm

GSS Session 3 - Rural Schools
Participants: Exploring the Influence of Context on the Leadership Capacity of Rural Public School Principals Ian Christopher Kinkley, Michigan State University This study examines how experience, preparation, and context interact to influence the instructional leadership capacity of rural school principals. Interviews with two Illinois principals explore: how they perceive themselves within their contexts; the challenges and successes as instructional leaders; the expectations of the district, community, and state; and how they are held accountable. Findings suggest these principals prefer rural settings and feel their abilities are well suited for the contexts in which they operate. Fostering Regional Learning Improvement Coherence: A Study of Educational Service Agencies and Successful Rural Schools (GSS) Wesley Henry, University of Washington This paper explores the structures that promote coherence for learning improvement efforts between rural schools, districts and educational service agencies (ESAs) and, regionally, across districts within an ESA. Structural and service links between sustainably improving rural schools/districts across three ESAs were investigated, and findings highlight the ability of ESA administrators to leverage economies of scale and marshal broad improvement initiatives. Additionally, the challenges of remoteness are explored in the context of ongoing improvement efforts.  Facilitator: Cindy J Reed, Northern Kentucky University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

1:10pm

GSS Session 4 - Developing Principals Before and On the Job
Participants: Transformative Learning in Principal Leadership Development Taeyeon Kim, Michigan State University The purpose of this study is to examine how school principals experience transformative learning in relation to leadership development and how these experiences affect principals’ perceptions and actions. By using qualitative data collected through in-depth interviews with ten school principals in K-12 level, this study examines the process of principals’ transformative learning. Analyzing principals’ leadership development with a transformative learning theory lens is useful to expand theoretical discourses in leadership and to draw practical implications. Leading from the Inside Out: Examining Principal Efficacy and Practice Lori Wilt Silver, George Mason University Social cognitive research in efficacy is one lens for examining not only how effectiveness is identified, enacted, and evaluated within schools, but how efficacy may be manifested and demonstrated at leadership positions and collective levels. This paper is meant to provide a review of the broad conceptual study of efficacy and its relationship to leadership practices. School Leaders and School Leadership Standards: An Exploratory Case Study Annie Reinish, University of Michigan The purpose of this paper is to examine how current K-12 mentor principals in one Midwestern state make sense of and utilize school leadership preparation standards. This qualitative, exploratory case study used interview data from a purposive sample of eight principal mentors in a diverse group of schools. Findings suggest that school leadership standards are a useful tool for mentoring aspiring school leaders, but the way in which this tool is understood and utilized varies. Cultivating Leadership for School and Community Change: A Case Study of Theory, Research and Practice Samuel Garcia, Texas State University This qualitative study examines a nuanced space of school leadership by examining the formal educational experiences of teachers enrolled in the emerging leaders pilot program. The emerging leaders pilot program was imagined and implemented after a sustained conversation and mutual partnership between the university and the local school district. Facilitator: Gary Crow, Indiana University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

1:10pm

GSS Session 5 - The Current State of Educator Preparation
Participants: A Systematic Literature Review: Understanding the Research about Principal Preparation Programs Jeremy B Landa, University of Connecticut This systematic literature review is an evaluation of the reporting on principal preparation programs. It attempts to understand whether reporting uses a dominant framework, the types of stakeholders who participate in the studies, and the quality of the instruments used to collect data. Findings include a majority of articles being oriented towards scientific management, the majority of participants in the study being practicing principals, and unreported analysis of reliability and validity of instruments used Individual Reflections on Principal Certification in the "Third Space" Karina C. Canaba, University of Texas - El Paso; Rodolfo Rincones, University of Texas - El Paso Principal certification programs are meant to provide students with tools necessary to allow individuals to professionally transition to educational leaders. They accelerate individual’s socialization into a new position or world they may not be entirely familiar with. This study looks to better understand the process of how one transitions within the “third space;” the realm where you are no longer just a teacher but still not yet a principal. Restructuring the ESEA: Articulating Empirically Based Pathways for States to Promote Principal Preparation Program Redesigns Craig Warner De Voto, University of Illinois at Chicago This presentation will show how Title II of the ESEA can be restructured to articulate empirically based pathways for state redesigns of principal preparation programs. Facilitator: Michael P O'Malley, Texas State University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 1:10pm - 2:15pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

2:25pm

GSS Session 10 - Using Theory and Discourse to Explain Complexity
Participants: An Analysis of the Complexity of a District Leadership Team's Understanding of Inclusion Karen Ramlackhan, University of South Florida The multiplicity of meanings of inclusion within special education have shaped the development and implementation of policies, procedures, and practices regarding inclusive education. This polarizing issue has created a rift among practitioners and researchers regarding where and how children with disabilities should be educated. This critically-oriented discourse analysis explored how the discourses of inclusion are constructed, practices are normalized, and power relations are legitimized within a district leadership team via power/knowledge nexus and disciplinary power. Deconstructing a Complex Context of Discipline Policy Implementation: An Ecology Metaphor Approach Wei-Ling Sun, University of Texas - Austin A growing body of work examines discipline outcomes and effects on students of color and students with special needs. But taking a more complex social cultural approach on understanding discipline policy implementation remains a challenge. This paper reviews recent literature on school discipline policies, highlights important research questions, and uses an ecology metaphor to propose a set of conceptual tools to examine the social, political, linguistic aspects of school discipline policy implementation. A Teacher Leadership Policy-Viewed Through the Lens of Institutional Theory Matthew Stier, University of Iowa Using an institutional theory lens, this study seeks to understand the development and implementation of a state policy to promote teacher leadership roles within Iowa K-12 schools. This study uses a qualitative analysis of public discourse to provide a picture of the environmental and organizational factors affecting implementation, with a focus on structural changes and cultural changes. Data sources included policy documents, guidance provided to school districts, and newspaper articles. Queer the Power! Queer Theory and the Promise of Student Activism Susan M Croteau, Texas State University Humanity is currently facing multiple crises that put our future in great peril. Student activism may offer hope for the solution of these problems. Although many theoretical perspectives can be used to understand student activist movements, Queer Theory provides an overarching concept that helps unify the disparate issues addressed by them: binary thinking. In this paper, the author makes an argument using Queer Theory to analyze and encourage student activism. Facilitator: Joan Poliner Shapiro, Temple University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:25pm - 3:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

2:25pm

GSS Session 6 - The Intersection of Culture and Principal Leadership
Participants: Leadership Perceptions of Campus Programs for Refugee Students Richard Pelton, Texas State University; A. Minor Baker, Texas State University This study examines how educational leaders perceive the efficacy of campus-based programs for adolescent-age refugees. Campus and district leaders establish programs for these students to grow academically and become members of the local school community. This study uses qualitative methods to focus on the perceptions of campus leaders on programs that prepare students to meet campus and district goals. The results show that leadership decisions with greater cultural responsiveness increase program effectiveness. Bilingual Teacher Identity Development in a Culturally Relevant Educational Space Brenda Rubio, University of Texas - Austin This ethnographic study examines the motivations bilingual Latina/o educators have to seek out and participate in alternative educational spaces outside school that promote the curricular recognition of alternative epistemologies and pedagogies to foster students’ race, cultures and languages. This work can potentially help those involved in policy making to better understand the need for inclusive, culturally rich educational space and curriculum for Latina/o teachers and to uncover holistic ways to support bilingual educators. Serving Students Through Culturally Proficient Leadership Miriam D. Ezzani, University of North Texas; Renee Agent, N/A; Jeffrey Bradley, N/A; Ivy Foss, University of North Texas; Nakendrick Johnson, University of North Texas; Laura Koehler, University of North Texas; Conrad Streeter, University of North Texas Three papers jointly authored by seven doctoral students explore what they learned from the literature, theory, research, and interview analyses to develop specific recommendations for moving an institution and individuals within it on the high end of the spectrum toward culturally proficient leadership. Facilitator: Michael Dantley, Miami University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:25pm - 3:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

2:25pm

GSS Session 7 - Maintaining Focus on Student Achievement in Schools
Participants: Linking Collaborative Leadership Practices to Increased Student Achievement Pamela M. VanHorn, Ohio State University This study explores how the implementation of a collaborative leadership model across a school district predicts changes in student achievement. VanHorn & VanHorn (2014) developed a survey to measure the fidelity and level of implementation of the Ohio Improvement Process; a research based collaborative improvement process (OIP). The survey identifies principal perceptions of OIP implementation within their school and district. Multi-level regression analysis is used to explore the influence of collaborative leadership on student achievement. Teacher Perception of Attributes Related to Teaching Effectiveness in Urban Schools Meredith Lea Wronowski, University of Oklahoma This study was conducted to determine what attributes urban teachers believe are necessary for effective teaching in an urban, high needs school. Three latent constructs, Growth and Adaptability, Professional Teaching Skills, and Relationships with Students, were identified using EFA and CFA. MANOVA indicated overall differences on the set of attributes among teachers of different demographics including teachers at different career stages and different routes to teacher certification. Implications for school leaders are also discussed. The School Leaders' Role in Students' Mathematics Achievement Through the Lens of Complexity Theory (GSS) Emma Bullock, Utah State University This explanatory sequential mixed methods study, utilizing both survey (N=250) and focus group (N=24) data from K-12 principals in a mid-western state, serves to inform current school leaders, and future research, on aspects of school leadership through the lens of complexity theory, including the use of the School Leadership in a Complex Adaptive System (SL-CAS) Framework to understand the role school leaders play in students’ mathematics achievement. Facilitator: Scott Christopher McLeod, University of Colorado-Denver


Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:25pm - 3:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

2:25pm

GSS Session 8 - Understanding and Tackling Policies and Politics
Participants: The Politics of Hungry Students: A Historical Analysis of Paradigm Shifts in School-Based Nutrition Programs Christine Tran, University of Washington School-based nutrition policy changes have made the implementation process complex and tenuous across sectors of politics, policy, and educational administration. This research aims to provide context to the paradigm shifts of school-based nutrition programs by analyzing the convergence of social problems, politics, policy, and research overtime. Understanding the history behind the enactment, expansion, and evolution of school nutrition provides a greater understanding between how the relationship between school and nutrition is tenuous today. Small Schools Re-imagined Aisha Haynes, New York University The purpose of this literature review will be to examine how the educational reform efforts that led to small schools are increasingly becoming vehicles of gentrification in New York City. Small schools were created with the intention of disrupting the sorting process that once characterized the large comprehensive school. This study examines how these goals have fared in the face of rapidly changing communities Clinical Scholarship: A Tale of Two School Districts, Addressing De Facto Segregation in Montgomery County, PA Heather Nicole Bennett, Pennsylvania State University The purpose of this case study is to describe and compare how federal, state, and local housing and school district policies of two suburban school districts, within an affluent Northeast county function together to impact racial and economic demographic segregation between these school districts. The Power of People: How Grassroots Movements Inspire Change Debra Sue Vance Noelk, Florida Atlantic University This qualitative study explores how a grassroots movement, United Opt Out, has impacted state and federal policies concerning high stakes testing. The study identified four themes that contributed to the movement’s success. The movement is fueled by parents’ anger and outrage at the current public school high stakes testing policies and encourages student civil disobedience. It is essential that participants stay focused on one message to remain successful. Social media has played a pivotal role. Facilitator: Stephen Louis Jacobson, University at Buffalo, SUNY


Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:25pm - 3:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

2:25pm

GSS Session 9 - School Working Conditions and Climate
Participants: Leaders' Framing of School Climate Policy Scott Hurwitz, University of Connecticut; Sarah Woulfin, University of Connecticut This paper uses framing theory to understand how district and school leaders interpret and enact school climate policy. We draw on interview data to answer questions about the intersection of leadership and school climate policy. We reveal that leaders’ frames invoked data and experts’ ideas in order to build support around climate policy. We also attend to perceived factors that enable or impede progress in school climate policy implementation. Teacher Job Satisfaction, Victimization, and Authoritarian Discipline Ryan Kapa, Ohio State University; Belinda G. Gimbert, Ohio State University This study examines the effect of teacher victimization and authoritarian discipline on job satisfaction. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore the relationship among these variables. Results show that teachers experiencing threats or attacks from students are less likely to rate their job satisfaction highly. The authoritarian discipline style is positively associated with reporting high job satisfaction. Administrators should be aware of the effects of consistent rule enforcement and teacher victimization on job satisfaction. Significant Predictors of Urban Principal Turnover Lorna Beckett, University of Denver Research indicates principal turnover is increasing but there are limited studies within an urban context as to why principals are leaving their schools. This study used multiple regression analysis to examine eight independent variables and their relationship to principal turnover in Colorado urban schools. The findings indicate that the percentage of minority students is the only predictor of principal turnover with urban principals staying at their schools an average of two years. Re-envisioning Teacher Leadership to Improve Working Conditions: Implications for School Governance and Teacher Retention Sara Kemper, University of Minnesota Education leaders and researchers have long called attention to high rates teacher turnover in U.S. public schools. Teacher leadership opportunities have been suggested by previous research to play an important role in teacher satisfaction and retention. This paper integrates research on teacher leadership, working conditions, and retention and satisfaction to arrive at a reconceptualization of teacher leadership as legitimate participation in school governance and to frame future research and interventions aimed at addressing teacher turnover. Facilitator: Diana G Pounder, University of Utah


Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:25pm - 3:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

3:40pm

GSS Session 11 - Ignite! - Leaders and Leadership in Schools
Participants: Demanding Inclusivity: An Exploration of Strategies to Cultivate Inclusive Schools and Galvanize Leaders Rana T Razzaque, University of Denver This Ignite will engage the audience in a provocative journey exploring oppression experienced by disenfranchised students, and re-envisioning leadership, praxis, and systemic approaches to creating safe and inclusive spaces for diverse students. The visual experience is complemented with spoken word and a call to action which not only galvanizes leaders from all facets of the education arena to embrace greater urgency in this work, but also provides actionable strategies to cultivate inclusive schools and organizations. Helping English Language Learners with Their Academic Achievement from Principals’, Teachers’ and Parents’ Perspectives Sijia Zhang, University of Alabama The researcher will prepare separate protocols for principals, ELL teachers, and parents. The study aims to find out how perceptions of principals on ELLs are able to help them attain better academic achievement, how principals as instructional leaders are able to facilitate teachers to perform best instructional practice on ELL students, and what is the role of parents in supporting schools, principals, and teachers toward a betterment of English language learners. Community, Culture and School Improvement: A Rural School’s Transformation Wesley Henry, University of Washington This Ignite! talk highlights school transformation work unfolding in a remote, rural school in Washington state. This talk explores the principal’s learning improvement agenda and provides a snapshot of the work done in this high-poverty school and with the diverse community to improve students’ performance and their educational experience. Themes include: Leveraging external requirements for improvement efforts; Grounding practice in research; and Engaging the community by embracing students’ heritage. Facilitator: Maria Luisa Gonzalez, N/A


Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:40pm - 4:45pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

3:40pm

GSS Session 12 - Examining Today's Teachers
Participants: Leadership, Race and “Property”: An Analysis of the Teacher Tracking Phenomenon Darrius A Stanley, Michigan State University Although numerous scholars have tackled student-tracking issues in schools, considerably less research has been done to examine how faculty could be tracked in similar ways. This conceptual paper expands the Finley (1984) definition of Teacher Tracking by illuminating the historical and racial aspects that were previously ignored. Utilizing Critical Race Theory, this paper seeks to both illuminate this phenomenon and ignite discussion about how school leadership should address it. The Convenient Credential: Pursuing Legitimacy Through TFA Davis Clement, College of William and Mary As we re-envision post-NCLB educational leadership, what is noteworthy in the increasing influence of TFA is not the tide of self-styled hero teachers with simplistic, romantic notions of teaching. It is the legitimation of shallow expertise from the most influential voices in education reform. This study identifies in accepted TFA applicants the idea that classrooms are a testing ground for personal grit and a platform from which to launch policy careers. The Need for a System Observation Tool Whitney Hegseth, University of Michigan School districts across the country have increasingly relied on standards-based teacher evaluation tools. In this paper, I intersect three widespread tools (FFT, CLASS, and PLATO) alongside the Montessori and IB standards for teachers and schools, and argue that the tools fail to capture three central priorities found in these school systems. These priorities concern restraint, integration, and respect. After highlighting how these tools fall short, I propose reasons for, and ways around, this disconnect. A Mixed Methods Study of Teacher Evaluation Reforms and Micropolitics in Illinois David L Conrad, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign This mixed methods study will examine the phenomena of teacher evaluation and how micropolitics has influenced the implementation of teacher evaluation policy reforms in Illinois. The study will use an explanatory sequential mixed methods design with the follow-up explanation variant. In phase one, FOIA requests will collect personnel data from Illinois public schools. In phase two, qualified evaluators will be interviewed. The results are important for policymakers to evaluate the effectiveness of policy reforms. Facilitator: Jo Beth Jimerson, Texas Christian University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:40pm - 4:45pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

3:40pm

GSS Session 13 - The Influence of Legislation and State Education Policies
Participants: Controlled School Choice: A Review of Policy Implementation Literature Wesley Edwards, University of Texas - Austin Increasing levels of school segregation has disturbing implications for the future of student achievement. Controlled school choice (CSC) is a school selection policy with the goal of allowing parents choice in what school their child will attend while also managing the composition of schools in a district, based on various desired demographic factors. This literature review seeks to better understand this policy, providing practical information to districts leaders and policy makers considering CSC. How State Education Agencies Are Administering School Turnaround: 15 Years After No Child Left Behind (GSS) Bryan A. VanGronigen, University of Virginia School turnaround—the rapid improvement of student achievement in low-performing schools—is increasingly a major topic of interest in K-12 public education. Yet, policymakers have divergent views about how to realize turnaround. Federal legislation, especially ESSA, has left varying degrees of school improvement-related responsibilities up to states. This study captures the complexity state education agencies (SEAs) face when administering turnaround and how a majority of SEAs do not lead efforts, but contract with external providers. The Impact of Michigan's P.A. 277: Evidence from NAEP Thomas Drake, Michigan State University In 2011, Michigan Public Act 277 was passed into law. Public Act 277 of 2011 lifted Michigan’s previous cap on the number of charter schools. The government presented this bill as providing the opportunity of choice to families in failing school districts (Chubb & Moe, 1990; Friedman, 1962; State of Michigan, 2011). To study the impact of Public Act 277 of 2011, this paper will use data form the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP). Toward Understanding School Choice Policies and Practices Through the Interplay of Structure, Culture, and Agency Amanda U. Potterton, Arizona State University Market-based school choice policies and practices are rapidly expanding throughout the country, and an increase in charter schools and Education Management Organizations (Miron & Gulosino, 2013) raises new questions about public education’s future. I suggest that the multi-directional interplay of structure, culture, and agency (Datnow, Hubbard, & Mehan, 2002) is a helpful theoretical framework for understanding how school choice policies and practices are constructed as parents and other stakeholders navigate schooling in an education market. Facilitator: Andrea K. Rorrer, University of Utah


Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:40pm - 4:45pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

3:40pm

GSS Session 14 - Graduating High School and The Prospect of College
Participants: “Finding that Balance”: Choosing between Culture, Content, and College Readiness at One International High School Chandler Patton Miranda, New York University In the U.S., approximately one out of two students who enter high school with this profile will never graduate. Yet, Fine et al. (2005) found that the International High Schools have extraordinarily high graduation rates and extraordinarily low drop-out rates, even when compared to native English speaking students. The purpose of this interpretive case study is to explore what assumptions about student learning underpin one IHS's approach to assessment.  Revitalizing the College Search Phase: An Examination of Student and School Level Effects Jesse Wood, University of Tennessee at Knoxville; Lee D. Flood, University of Tennessee at Knoxville; Alex Nathan Oldham, University of Tennessee at Knoxville This quantitative study examined the impact of student college search and school practices that support search on postsecondary enrollment. With the use of college choice theory, analysis from a logistic regression revealed that school counselors and student initiated search practices positively impacted postsecondary enrollment for secondary students, while school organized campus visits reduced the probability of enrollment. The results from this study have implications for better school practices that increase college access for all students. Persisting Versus Dropping Out: 5th Year Seniors Gregory White, Michigan State University This research explores why high school seniors, who do not graduate on time, persist in an effort to obtain a high school diploma instead of dropping out or seeking a GED, which is the more traditional trajectory. Structured interviews tease out underlying reasons for this divergence, interrogating personal and structural domains, while a nationally representative data set exposes this phenomenon on a national level. Over Aged, Under Credited, And College Ready? Nakia M Gray, New York University Transfer high schools are charged with the task of preparing over aged, under credited students for graduation and college. This purpose of this qualitative case study is to offer a perspective into how a transfer school leader in conjunction with community partnerships utilizes partnerships and pre-college transition programs to redefine college readiness and student success. Facilitator: Martha N. Ovando, University of Texas - Austin


Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:40pm - 4:45pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

3:40pm

GSS Session 15 - Issues on Diversity in U.S. Schools
Participants: Colonizing/Decolonizing Policies in Native American Education: Rhetoric vs. Reality in ESSA Title VI Michael R Scott, University of Texas - Austin This paper examines the Title VII provision of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, which provides additional resources for Native American students, and its application within a school program. By applying the Deleuzian concept of assemblage as a postqualitative method, the policy and the related program operating within a neoliberal and neocolonial framework is interrogated. Promoting the decolonization of students, an engagement with the policy assemblage shows that its performance opposes its intent. Absent and Voiceless: The Role of Asian Educators in Combating the “Model Minority” Myth Chi Phuong Nguyen, Pennsylvania State University This study examines the percentages of Asian students, teachers, and principals in public schools from 1990 to 2010 using Texas as a case study site. The preliminary findings revealed an extremely low percentage of Asian teachers and principals relative to the percentage of Asian students. These findings support prior literature and further emphasize that the absence of Asian educators may explain the perpetuation of the "model minority" myth and its negative consequences for Asian students. Cultural and Social Capital of Migrant Families: A Case Study of Korean Visiting Scholars Warapark Maitreephun, University of Missouri; Jinmyung Choi, University of Missouri; Kimberly Renee Starks Berglund, University of Missouri Korean visiting scholars encounter complex contexts, preparing their children back and forth to attend the U.S. and Korean schools. Claimed by Bourdieu (1986) and Coleman (1988), cultural and social capital affects children's education and trajectories. This study aims to examine how the families utilize these capitals to enhance their children’s education. Six migrant parents at Midwest University in Orson City (Pseudonym) will be interviewed and the results will be presented by using content analysis. Redefining Student Success: A Look at Nigerian Immigrant Students in the United States Victoria Olubiyi, University of Wisconsin-Madison Research shows that Nigerians love western education because it generates a vast array of opportunities for them economically, socially, and otherwise. It is also for this reason that Nigerian immigration in the United States has grown. However, by making their way into the States, forces them to recreate another form of identity so that they are able to assimilate in the American school culture and society to ensure their academic success. Facilitator: Katherine Cumings Mansfield, Virginia Commonwealth University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:40pm - 4:45pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

4:55pm

GSS Roundtable Session A - Building and Tuning Identities
Participants: Leadership Efficacy for Cultural Competence in Diverse Schools Jessica Schwartzer, George Mason University; Lori Wilt Silver, George Mason University The purpose of this proposal is to explore school leaders self-efficacy in leadership roles related to cultural competence in order to address the achievement gap due to cultural mismatch within schools. The Impact of Cultural Proficiency on Teachers Isaiah Clarence McGee, Iowa State University This paper seeks to examine the impact of an in-depth course on cultural proficiency on teacher. Participants will be assessed on their knowledge on issues related to equity and diverse student environments using the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI). Participants will then participate in a course on the cultural proficiency. Participants will then be given the IDI again as a post-assessment to assess their gain in knowledge on equitable issues. Imagine Me a Teacher: Competence and Credibility in Teacher Development Davis Clement, College of William and Mary The purpose of this study is to describe the complexity of factors—beyond the education reform milieu—that contribute to a student’s participation in Teach for America and development of teacher identity. In a critical micro-ethnographic comparative case study of the experiences of five TFA applicants and five preservice teachers, I will answer the questions, ‘What factors influence the development of teacher identity in TFA applicants and preservice teachers?’ Dr. Sandra Wright Biography: A Forerunner in Leadership and Ministry Karon Radford, Stephen F. Austin State University This study was designed to investigate how one woman overcame obstacles to become a success in the fields of leadership and ministry. The method of inquiry used was memoir biography. The research was conducted with an African American woman who is the leader of a rural community hospital and the leader of two United Methodist Churches. Facilitator: Katherine Rodela, Washington State University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 4:55pm - 6:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

4:55pm

GSS Roundtable Session B - Charter Schools
Participants: A Measure of Efficiency Between Charter schools and Traditional Public Schools in Michigan Michael B Carrauthers, Wayne State University This paper will measure the efficiency between charter schools and traditional public schools in Michigan. A quantitative analysis of archived 4th grade reading and math scores from the MEAP Assessment will be utilized. Over 1700 elementary schools in Michigan will be examined. This paper will have policy implications concerning charter and traditional public school in the US and school finance. Charter School Innovation Versus Replication and Expansion: Complementary or Competing Goals? Elise Castillo, University of California Berkeley A primary aim of charter schools is to facilitate innovation in governance and practices. Since 2010, federal grants have supported the replication and expansion of charter schools, particularly charter management organizations (CMOs). As CMOs proliferate with federal policy and funding support, we know little about the implications for innovation. This descriptive study examines the extent to which federal CMO grantees experiment with innovative approaches. Neoliberalism Charter Schools: Panacea or Problems for Twenty-first Century Education Donna Michelle Druery, Texas A & M University The discussion of charter schools on public and private education is imperative. While I am not against charter schools, per se, I am against the for-profit style of management that allows private entities to earn millions of dollars while public schools are oftentimes left with those the private schools will not take, either based on admissions policies, testing or purported lottery enrollment chances. This loophole must be closed in order to truly educate all students. Facilitator: Lolita Tabron, University of Denver


Wednesday November 16, 2016 4:55pm - 6:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

4:55pm

GSS Roundtable Session C - Community Partnerships
Participants: From Segregation to Celebration: A Dynamic Methodology that Rebuilds Communities Richard Pelton, Texas State University; Brett Lee, Texas State University; Samuel Garcia, Texas State University This proposal details an approach to community engagement and change through generating spaces for community and educational leaders. This session introduces a dynamic methodology that invokes P-12 and higher education leadership to re-envision the complex settings of urban environments to create spaces of participatory action-based research.  The intent of this critical conversation is to reclaim public spaces through community inquiry. New partnerships, research methods, and pedagogies contextualize practice and introduce viable and sustainable partnerships. Understanding the Desires and Theories of Change for Educational Equity and Justice Frances Free Ramos, Univ of California Berkeley In this study, I will use oral histories to learn more about the desires and theories of action of different community leaders and activists involved in struggles to improve educational access, quality, and outcomes for marginalized communities. How did community members attempt to improve the condition of schooling and of the schools through engaging the district, and when did they shift their focus towards alternative models outside the district? Building A College Ready Community: A Small School with Big Plans and Big Partnerships Nakia M Gray, New York University As the issue of college readiness gains greater attention, schools work to utilize programs and partnerships to redefine what college readiness means in the context of their school community. Through partnerships with CBOs, philanthropist groups, and pre-college transition programs as an important contribution to preparing students for higher education. This qualitative case study offers a perspective into the pre-college transition program information gathering and disseminating practices of a small high school. District Governance in Changing Urban Landscapes: Race and Class Politics of Public-Private Partnerships in District Policymaking René Espinoza Kissell, University of California, Berkeley This qualitative comparative case study of two school districts seeks to understand the race and class politics of community engagement in portfolio management models (PPM). This paper draws on urban regime theory to illustrate how urban political and historical landscapes shape community support for district-level reforms. Data collection includes interviews, observations, and document analysis. Findings from this study will illuminate the connection between urban austerity under state and federal disinvestment and public-private district partnerships. Facilitator: Jada Phelps-Moultrie, Portland State University


Wednesday November 16, 2016 4:55pm - 6:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

4:55pm

GSS Roundtable Sessions D and E
024-1. GSS Roundtable Session D - International Students and Education Policy
Graduate Student Summit
Graduate Student Roundtable Participants: Higher Education and Empowerment of Saudi Women as an effect of King Abdullah Scholarship Program Lama Husain Al Assaf, Howard University This study is ongoing that has a review about feminist and how they be empowered. The study will explore how does culture develop and support leadership and students’ success as a global issues and contexts influencing the field of educational leadership and Saudi policy? How can changes in education policy support the need to revitalize educational leadership in Saudi community as a first time widely for women? How does changing affect educational policy development? Socialization and Persistence of First Year Non-Western International Master’s Students in a U.S. Midwestern University Emmanuel Akanwa, Central Michigan University This qualitative phenomenological study seeks to understand the influence of socialization on the persistence of first year non-Western international master’s students studying at a U.S. mid-Western university. The literature is replete with studies that detail the challenges faced by international students, however, there is a dearth of studies that describe how socialization influences international students’ persistence which in turn enhances degree completion. Facilitator: Angela Urick, University of Oklahoma 024-2. GSS Roundtable Session E - Media and Technology in Education
Graduate Student Summit
Graduate Student Roundtable Participants: From Digital Divide to Digital Inclusion, Questioning Policy and Practice Ahmed Mukhtar, University of Missouri The purpose of this study is to explore the role of education leaders in building and sustaining a positive culture that promotes progress toward equitable technology access among learners. It also attempts to address issues of opportunity, access, and knowledge at the level of policy and practice. Aspects of equity, ethics, digital literacy and digital access gaps will be discussed. The research result contributes to making progress toward digital empowerment and to redefining student success.  Universalized Computer-Based Tests in Nigeria: An Evaluation of Senior Secondary School (SSIII) Students Preparedness Lawrence Ikechukwu Nwabueze, University of Dayton Computer-Based test is becoming very popular around the world. However, given the complex socio-political and economic context of the Nigerian society, it is not quite evident that Nigeria is prepared for the transition from paper-based to computer-based tests. Motivated by the theoretical framework that the capacity for, and readiness for change are essential for successful educational change initiatives, the proposed study seeks evidence that high schools students in Nigeria are prepared for computer-based tests. Facilitators: Kathleen Winn, University of Virginia Yinying Wang, Georgia State University

Session Participants

Wednesday November 16, 2016 4:55pm - 6:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

4:55pm

GSS Roundtable Sessions F, G, and H
025-1. GSS Roundtable Session F - School Policies and Decision-Making
Graduate Student Summit
Graduate Student Roundtable Participants: Curriculum Leadership in Changing Demographics: A new Challenge to School Leadership. Mahmoud Sayed Marei, University of Arizona This study investigated ways in which school leaders responded to the new ‘Accelerated’ English Language Development (ELD) curriculum in public high schools in Southern Arizona (emphasis added). The analysis of the curriculum and class observations alluded to profound discrepancies in the implementation of ELD which created great challenges to teachers. On the other hand, principals had different approaches depicting curriculum and instructional leadership practices. Behavioral Decision-Makers’ Perceptions of Exclusionary Discipline Decisions and the Influence of Implicit Bias Gina Laura Gullo, Lehigh University Behavioral decision-makers, such as principals and assistant principals, use exclusionary disciplinary despite inefficacies and detrimental effects. Major inequities in ED exist by race, gender, socioeconomic status, and more; but few studies investigated the process and possible predictors of these inequities. One study suggested implicit bias might predict racial inequities in ED. With research beginning to demonstrate the ability to correct for implicit biases, this connect may be key to eliminating inequities. Leading Through Externally Mandated Curriculum Reform in Indonesian Elementary Schools Asih Asikin-Garmager, University of Iowa; Enny Asmororini, Universitas Mataram, Indonesia This conceptual paper aims to propose hypotheses on leadership practices needed to get teachers to embrace student-centered pedagogy beyond mere compliance. Our research is guided by the following research question: What leadership practices do Indonesian elementary school principals should implement to successfully lead their schools through the change? To develop hypotheses, we draw from the literature on organizational change and curriculum implementation. Facilitator: Hilary Lustick, Texas State University 025-2. GSS Roundtable Session G - Student Performance in Schools
Graduate Student Summit
Graduate Student Roundtable Participants: AP Access and Equity for All: Recruiting, Supporting, and Securing success for Black and Latin@ Students Michael Kucera, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Many school districts are engaged in efforts to increase diversity in Advanced Placement courses. Enrollment trends show both an upswing in diversity and a disparity in proportional enrollment and achievement between Black and Latin@ students and their White and Asian peers (College Board, 2014). This research will examine the role of leadership, community-wide attitudes, and initiatives in recruiting, supporting, and securing success for Black and Latin@ students in AP coursework. Impact of Opportunity Structure on the Academic Preparation of African Americans in STEM in High School LaTanya Dixon, University of Mississippi The purpose of this roundtable paper is to examine the influence of high school STEM opportunity structures on the academic preparation of African American students majoring in STEM disciplines at four-year universities in Mississippi. Investigating these opportunity structures and others can have implications for school practices, scholar advocates, and policymakers. Relationship Between School Climate and High School Students’ Academic Achievement: Focus on Heterogeneity Within Races/Ethnicities Lukretia A Beasley-Knecht, University of Arizona Research shows that there is a relationship between school climate and students’ academic performance. Rather than examining the prevalent race/ethnicity achievement gaps where each race/ethnicity is treated as one homogenous group, this quantitative study explores within race/ethnicity group differences of high school students academic achievement and its relationship to school climate using a current data set (Arizona Safe and Supportive Schools, 2014). Facilitator: Erin Anderson, University of Denver 025-3. GSS Roundtable Session H - The Principal Pipeline
Graduate Student Summit
Graduate Student Roundtable Participants: Exploring Match Quality of Principals in Rural Schools Ian Christopher Kinkley, Michigan State University This proposed research study seeks to explore the match quality of principals in rural schools. Given the generally small size of rural schools, principals may find themselves as the only administrator in the school. The quality of administrative leadership may hinge entirely on the capacity and quality of a single individual. Therefore, it would seem critical to understand who is accepting principal positions in rural schools and, of these, who are effective. Texas Secondary School Latinas Elsa G Villarreal, Texas A & M University In Texas, the 2014 Hispanic population was estimated at 10.4 million. Hispanic women principals are underrepresented in our nation's schools, specifically at the secondary school level. The purpose of this phenomenological case study is to analyze the perspectives and experiences Texas secondary school Latina principals concerning the challenges they may have faced due to their ethnicity and gender. The findings from this study will assist educational leaders in re-evaluating their mentoring and recruitment programs. Leading Complex Organizational Change for Principal Quality: A Proposed Study of Principal Pipeline Leadership Emily Kate Donaldson, University of Washington This roundtable session presents and seeks feedback on a proposed dissertation study on the leadership of principal pipeline initiatives in large urban school districts. Principal pipeline initiatives, or district-led programs that align all the learning support principals receive throughout their careers, are theoretically promising; however, their complexity renders them extremely challenging to implement. How do district leaders navigate such challenges while leading for fundamental change in district organization and practice? Developing Novice School Principals Through Professional Mentoring and Social Capital Richard Young, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Recent scholarship has noted principal turnover in Illinois is a growing phenomenon as well as the trend for younger and less experienced principals entering the profession. This study will examine how principals utilize relationships to support their professional development through a mentorship. Professional Mentoring and Social Capital Theory is a construct through the relationship between a mentor and mentee by combining key tenants of mentoring literature and social capital theory. Facilitator: Bradley Davis, The University of Texas at Arlington

Session Participants
avatar for Lu Young

Lu Young

Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Kentucky
Retired from P12 education in KY after 31 1/2 years; 9 years as superintendent of Jessamine County Schools. Currently serving as Director of Next Generation Educational Partnerships, teaching principal preparation, and working with the Next Generation Leadership Academy. Areas of interest: superintendent prep, principal prep, leading for deeper learning


Wednesday November 16, 2016 4:55pm - 6:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

6:00pm

“Tested” – A Documentary Film and Reception hosted by the UCEA Executive Committee and Graduate Student Council
Join members of the UCAE Plenum, Executive Committee and Graduate Student Council for a reception and viewing of the documentary "Tested." The gap in opportunities for different races in America remains extreme. Nowhere is this more evident than our nation’s top public schools. In New York City, where blacks and Hispanics make up 70% of the city’s school-aged population, they represent less than 5% at the city’s most elite public high schools. Meanwhile Asian Americans make up as much as 73%. This documentary follows a dozen racially and socio-economically diverse 8th graders as they fight for a seat at one of these schools. Their only way in: to ace a single standardized test. Tested includes the voices of such education experts as Pedro Noguera and Diane Ravitch as it explores such issues as access to a high-quality public education, affirmative action, and the model-minority myth. TESTED was written and directed by Curtis Chin, a Detroit native and community activist. Curtis has written for ABC, Disney Channel, and Nickelodeon, and won awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, and the San Diego Asian American Film Foundation. The GSC and UCEA will host a fireside chat with Curtis on Saturday at 12:20 pm in Columbus. Presenters: Monica Byrne-Jimenez, Hofstra University Wesley Henry, University of Washington


Wednesday November 16, 2016 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier
 
Thursday, November 17
 

7:00am

UCEA Plenary Session II feat. Clinical Panel 'Building Bridges: Connecting Clinical Practice, Education Research, and Theory'
027-1. UCEA Plenary Session II
UCEA Annual Convention
Plenary Session 027-2. Building Bridges: Connecting Clinical Practice, Education Research, and Theory
UCEA Annual Convention
Plenary Session Presenters: Lu Young, University of Kentucky Karen Caldwell Bryant, University of Georgia Martinette Venable Horner, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Miriam D. Ezzani, University of North Texas

Session Participants

Thursday November 17, 2016 7:00am - 11:00am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

8:00am

8:00am

GSS Session 16 - Ignite! - Critical Examinations of Education and Educational Leadership
Participants: Alternative Ways for Improving Student Outcomes: A Restorative Approach to Teaching, Learning and Leading Anthony H. Normore, California State University Dominguez Hills; Jeanne Sesky, N/A; Omar Reyes, N/A; Tanya Franklin, N/A; Harriet R MacLean, N/A; Abdul Issa, N/A; Karen Junker, N/A; Jose Navarro, N/A; Chris Carr, N/A; Amen Mandela Rahh, N/A; Robert Jacquez, N/A; Jeffrey Garrett, N/A; Antonia Issa Lahera, California State University Dominguez Hills We will examine current realities for disenfranchised populations in several urban high school. Practicing principals and APs posit that an opportune time has come to share alternative models of restorative justice (as opposed to “Zero” tolerance, suspensions, expulsions, etc.) and practices that stakeholders will find beneficial. Lessons learned will improve the preparation and practice of school leaders, thus improve educational outcomes for all students, and help prevent the gross injustice done to at-risk children daily. Navigating White Racial Identity in Schools Jessica Schwartzer, George Mason University The purpose of this study is to explore the ways in which racial literacy, specifically around the question of white racial identity, informs the leadership practice of school leaders with predominately white staff working in majority-minority schools. This conceptual analysis seeks to develop clearer connections between the research literature on leadership styles and white racial identity development in ways that address the achievement gap due to cultural mismatch within schools. A Critical Policy Analysis of the 3rd Grade Reading Guarantee in Ohio Cleighton J. Weiland, Miami University The issues put forth in this Ignite! presentation are multifaceted, interconnected, and complex. Standardized assessments have been touted as the fulcrum of the reform movement; a mechanism to supposedly ensure quality learning is occurring in the classroom. However, the increased surveillance of students and schools has left a wake of chaos vis–à–vis unintended outcomes, perhaps even affecting the biology of our students through medical choices. Principal Preparation and Social Consciousness: Understanding Race and Privilege in Urban Schools Thomas Joseph Peterson, Chapman University Two areas will be discussed in this Ignite! session: limitations and criticisms of racial unconsciousness and colorblindness discourse in traditional principal preparation programs; and, the necessity of an improved social consciousness discourse in urban principal development programs. An integral study of antiracist leadership, critical race theory, and Whiteness ideology would provide emerging urban leaders with a heightened awareness of race and privilege, promoting a better understanding of the social forces that impact urban educational communities. Facilitator: Jeffrey S. Brooks, Monash University


Thursday November 17, 2016 8:00am - 9:05am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

9:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations - Examining Higher Education Programming and Policy Effecting Underrepresented Students
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: Traveling Abroad Years Ago and Still Talking About it Today: The Effects of Study Abroad Dallawrence Dean, University of Texas - Austin Policy Blackout? What can Educational Policies of PWIs tell us about Black Student Success Rates Genesis Ross, Miami University From the Fields to the Professoriate: Underrepresentation of Latino Males in Academia Hugo Alberto Saucedo, University of Texas at San Antonio Examining the Influence of Financial Aid Factors on the Graduation of Latina/o College Students at a Hispanic-Serving Institution: A Discrete-Time Hazard Model Vanessa Ann Sansone, University of Texas at San Antonio A Deeper Understanding: Directors’ Perspectives of Disability Service Programming in Postsecondary Institutions Warren Edward Whitaker, University of San Diego Facilitator: Elizabeth Murakami, Texas A&M University - San Antonio


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

9:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations - Examining the Curricular and Pro-Social Contributions of the Broader School Community
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: The Effectiveness of Professional Development for Early Childhood Teachers and their Communication with ESL Parents Kimberly Renee Starks Berglund, University of Missouri Retrospectively Pinpointing the School-to-Prison Pipeline through the Lenses of Formerly Incarcerated Black Men Denice D. Nabinett, The Ohio State University Perceptions of Quality and Readiness in Early Childhood Education Julie Kelly Desmangles, Clemson University The Impact of Leadership Content Knowledge on Academic Achievement in S.T.E.M. Charles Derek Collingwood, University of Arizona Disabling the Disparity: Building Cultural Competence of Educators through Standards-Based, Culturally Relevant Pedagogy Arlisa Armond, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Facilitator: Jeffrey S. Brooks, Monash University


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

9:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations - School Leaders and 21st Century Change: Re-envisioning Leadership for New Challenges and Opportunities
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: Gentrification and Schools: Implications for School Principals Chy Benelli McGhee, New York University Factors that Influence Principal Turnover in K-12 Schools Rui Yan, University of Utah Curriculum Leadership in a Changing Demographic: A New Challenge to School Principals Mahmoud Sayed Marei, University of Arizona Exploring the Influence of CARE (Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education) on Principals’ Leadership and Well-being Julia Mahfouz, Pennsylvania State University Facilitator: Maria Luisa Gonzalez, N/A


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

9:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations - Teachers as Social Justice Leaders: Understanding Complex Relationships Between Teachers, Equity, and Student Success
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: Culturally Competent Instructional Leaders: Perceptions of Special Education Teachers in Regards to African American Students Marilyn McCoy Player, Auburn University Redefining Student Success: Teacher Impact on Black Students' Sense of Belonging, Motivation and Achievement Jacqueline Jeanetta Perry-Higgs, North Carolina State University Leadership, Race and “Property”: An Analysis of the Teacher Tracking Phenomenon Darrius A Stanley, Michigan State University Teachers Unions and Racial Equity: The Role of Leadership in Social Justice Unionism Aditi Rajendran, University of Washington Examining the Relationship Between Teacher Qualification, School Resources, and Affective Factors as Indicators of STEM Career Aspirations: A Cross National Comparison of OECD Countries and the United States Using Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Jocabed G. Marquez, Texas State University Facilitator: Ann M. Ishimaru, University of Washington


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

9:15am

GSS Session 17 - Designing the Next Generation of Educational Leadership Preparation Programs
Participants: Arendtian Thought and Ethical School Leadership Rodney S Whiteman, Indiana University In this conceptual paper, I argue for incorporating Hannah Arendt’s moral and political philosophy in educational leadership preparation programs. To date, Arendt’s philosophy is seldom employed in educational leadership and administration. However, if Arendt is taken seriously, school leadership would be re-envisioned as leaders are called to act with both technical correctness as well as moral correctness. The paper describes Arendt’s moral-political philosophy and explores implications for educational leadership preparation and practice. Re-envisioning Leader Preparation: Do Critical Disability Studies Belong in Leadership Discourses? Katherine Lewis, Texas State University This paper examines leader preparation. Using a Critical Disability Studies (CDS) framework in program discourses allows leaders to uncover historical underpinnings of identity categories and their use in sorting students. Despite evidence of overrepresentation of students of color in special education, leadership discourses rarely address dis/ability. Viewing current inequities through this framework develops critical consciousness and uncovers social and racialized notions of ability, allowing for deeper discourse about equity for dis/abled students. Insights from Student, Parent, Community and School Stakeholders for a Social Justice Principal Preparation Program Gwendolyn Baxley, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Colleen A. Capper, University of Wisconsin-Madison This study explores the dispositions, knowledge and skills principals (DKS) need to lead for justice and equity as part of their leadership preparation program -- from the perspective of students, parents, community and school practioners. Critical school practioners as well as students, families, and communities who are traditionally marginalized in school spaces offer perspectives that radically critique inequitable practices within schools and (re)imagine how school leaders are prepared to respond to their academic and social needs. Social Justice Educational Leadership Preparation Programs: Presenting Future School Leaders with Tools for Change Shahlaine Kaur Dhillon, University of South Florida In this study, I examined a local university’s educational leadership preparation program through the lens of social justice leadership. By using the work of Theoharis (2007) and Diem and Carpenter (2015) I created a frame of which tenants should be present in order to present race and have students engage in a curriculum which would best help students internalize these theoretical concepts and be able to use them in practice. Facilitator: Paula Myrick Short, University of Houston

Session Participants
avatar for Becky Slothower

Becky Slothower

Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Ph.D. Doctoral Candidate, Oklahoma State University


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:20am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet

9:15am

GSS Session 18 - Creating More Capable Change Agents
Participants: Performance Elicitation: Keeping Performance Central While Interviewing Andrew David Bratspis, University of South Florida The purpose of this paper session will be to explicate the need for a newly defined research method, performance elicitation, within the field of educational leadership. Drawing from Performance Theory and Visual Arts Methods, specifically (digital)-photo elicitation, I will make a case that performance elicitation will produce more publishable scholarship, which will encourage and promote the growing trend of using performance within education leadership and development. Distributing Leadership Around Educational Technology to Diminish the Digital Divide Jillian Marie Conry, Southern Methodist University; Alexandra E Pavlakis, Southern Methodist University Inequities in technology access and use, labeled “the digital divide,” perpetuate societal disparities. Yet, educational leaders are tasked with addressing the divide with little research-based guidance. By synthesizing research on technology use, educational leadership, and home-school connections, we contribute to discussions of how leaders can support effective technology use inside and outside of school. Our findings suggest formal educational leaders can cultivate adults’ technology proficiencies, thereby turning teachers and parents into powerful instruments of change. Kierkegaard Doesn’t Help During a Fire Drill: Practivist Scholars Bridging the Theory and Practice Divide A. Minor Baker, Texas State University; Isaac Abram Torres, Texas State University; Richard Pelton, Texas State University; Jason Swisher, Texas State University Educational leaders seeking doctoral degrees are often divided into two camps, practitioner and scholar. This study provides a reaction to traditional educator leadership programs, which often assume an Ed.D is a practitioner degree and a Ph.D. is a theoretical degree, by investigating the ways doctoral programs can effectively bridge the gap between student as scholar and student as practitioner in the development of scholar-practitioners through dialogue, support, and collaboration Facilitator: Anthony Normore, California State University, Dominguez Hills


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:20am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

9:15am

GSS Session 19 - Methods to Raise Awareness and Advocacy
Participants: Situational Proactive Preparation: An Examination of Ethnic-Racial Socialization Practices of Parents of Young Children Dawn Williams, University of Washington A qualitative study was conducted to examine the ethnic-racial socialization practices of a diverse group of parents of young children under eight years old. Parents employed practices to expose their children to culture and prepare them for current and future bias. Parents offered suggestions to teachers about how to address race. Discussions about culture and race occurred because there was something a child was exposed to which resulted in a parent having to address it. Discussions on Race with a School Community Group Omar J. Salaam, University of South Florida Using an IRB approved research study project to inform my dissertation proposal, I expect to defend my proposal during the Summer-2016 semester. My study’s focus is on ways in which members of a school community group engage in conversations on race. Through a Critical Interpretivist lens, I am using Participatory Action Research methods (Kemmis & McTaggart, 2011), in facilitating discussions in an elementary International Baccalaureate magnet school with a diverse student population. Leading Entrepreneurial Education: A South African and Slovakian Perspective Zukiswa Mthimunye, Teachers College Columbia University; Jaromir Sedlar, University of Texas at Austin Political transformation in any national context is all encompassing, bringing with it the complexities of redefining many aspects of social life. However, developing entrepreneurial skills in high schools demands more from the curriculum, and teachers than producing future small business owners. In this comparative country case session, researchers will discuss a collaborative project between two schools of entrepreneurial leadership in South Africa and Slovakia. Reimagining the Discourse: A Historical Feminist Poststructural Discourse Analysis of Women Superintendents Lisa Cullington, University of Massachusetts Boston Women, particularly women of color, have been disproportionately represented at the highest levels of leadership in United States public schools since the creation of the superintendent position in the 1800s (Blount, 1998). Using feminist poststructuralism as a theoretical frame, this proposal identifies a historical discourse analysis as a useful methodological approach. This research methodology provides an innovative way of reframing and re-envisioning the discourse depicting educational leadership. Facilitator: Catherine A. Lugg, Rutgers University


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:20am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

9:15am

GSS Session 20 - The Changing Role of School Districts
Participants: Superintendents, School Boards, or Outsiders: Re-envisioning the Role of District Leaders in Enacting Policy Reforms Samantha E Holquist, University of Minnesota I propose an analysis to understand (1) how radical education policy reform occurs at the district level and (2) the role of district education leadership in making this reform. I analyze case study findings to ascertain the factors that influenced a radical policy reform’s formation and adoption. Findings increase our comprehension of how these reforms occur in district politics. Additionally, they challenge our understanding of the role of district leadership in advancing these reforms. Collaborating Across Boundaries: Educational Service Agency Use of Collaboration in Supporting Ambitious Instructional Reform Julie R Freeman, University of Michigan Drawing on comparative case study methodology, this study explores how three educational service agencies used collaboration as they supported their constituent districts in implementing the Common Core State Standards, an example of ambitious instructional reform. My findings suggest there are varying, yet overlapping, ways for these agencies to successfully leverage collaboration to support district and school reform, including providing resources, being the center for “common work,” and developing relationships. Re-envisioning School Leadership in a Rapid Growth District Jacye Jamar, University of North Texas; Greg Axelson, Lewisville Independent School District; Laurie Tinsley, University of North Texas This study examined the role of the central office staff to support capacity building in elementary principals in a rapid growth district. The theoretical framework consists professional capital, intrinsic motivation, the educational change process, and professional learning communities. This descriptive case study explored the current systems and structures in a rapid growth district. The findings from this study generated six themes necessary for continuous improvement in principals to occur within a rapid growth district. Central Office Transformation: A Shift in the Role of District Principal Supervisors Becky Slothower, Oklahoma State University Questions regarding the role and organizational structure of central office administration in public school districts across the nation have recently come to light of high-stakes policy environments mandating enhanced student performance. Federal and state policy mandates have placed demands on school district central offices. This paper examines the perceptions of principals involved in central office transformation, specifically principal supervision, that focuses on developing assistive relationships, and further developing instructional leadership skills with central office leaders. Facilitator: Karen L Sanzo, Old Dominion University


Thursday November 17, 2016 9:15am - 10:20am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

10:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations - Principal Identities and Leading in Complex Contexts: How Experiences Inform Building Level Practices
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: Breaking Suspicious Minds: High School Principals Perceptions on Behavioral Misconduct in Education Space Wei-Ling Sun, University of Texas - Austin Stories of African American Women Principals in Turnaround Schools Adrienne Aldaco, N/A The Afro-Latina Educational Leader: A Narrative Inquiry Wellinthon Garcia, Hofstra University Texas High School Latina Principals Elsa G Villarreal, Texas A & M University Facilitator: Julian Vasquez Heilig, California State University Sacramento

Thursday November 17, 2016 10:00am - 10:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

10:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations - Redefining Success: Developing Cultural Competence through Partnerships, Social Capital, and Mindfulness
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: Leveraging Interpersonal Trust Networks in Place-Based Partnerships to Achieve Educational Equity Amber Joy Banks, University of Washington The New "Eyes on the Prize:" School Leaders Pursuit of Equity Osly Flores, University of Pittsburgh Operationalizing Social Capital to Promote Equity Pedagogy: A Case Study of Thai School with Buddhist and Muslim Students Warapark Maitreephun, University of Missouri The Enlightened Educator: Exploring the Influence of Mindful Self-Awareness on Practicing Cultural Responsiveness Rana T Razzaque, University of Denver Culturally Responsive Teaching: Professional Development to Ensure The Academic Success of African American Learners Victoria Jones, Texas A & M University Facilitator: Daniel D. Spikes, Iowa State University


Thursday November 17, 2016 10:00am - 10:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

10:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations - State Level Policy in Complex Contexts: Examining Practice-Based Institutional Outcomes of Policy
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: Texas House Bill 5: Reform Realities in a Predominantly Latino School District Tomas Sigala, University of Texas - El Paso Policy Interpretations of Utah’s H.B. 144 and Higher Education Institutional Practices for Undocumented/DACAmented Students Liliana Estella Castrellon, University of Utah The Impact of State Policies on Changing Professional Preparation of School Principal: Systematic Literature Review Nahed AbdelRahman, Texas A & M University Facilitator: Hollie Mackey, University of Oklahoma


Thursday November 17, 2016 10:00am - 10:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

10:00am

Jackson Scholars Research Seminar Presentations: Student Success: Examining What We Know to Improve Schooling in Complex Contexts
Second-year Jackson Scholars will present on their research to date. Graduate Student Summit participants are invited and encouraged to attend as apart of the GSS. Participants: Improving the Practice of Mentoring by Improving the Training of Mentors Paul Spradley, University of Pittsburgh Lost in Translation: Academic Achievement of African American Students, Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Multiculturalism Joycelyn LaTonia Hughes, Howard University “Hopewell High We Will Remember Thee”: A Critical Look at Black Childhood in Rosenwald Schools (1912-1963) Kimberly Charis Ransom, University of Michigan Examining the Intersectional Invisibility of African-American Girls in High School Advanced Placement Classes Asia Nicole Fuller Hamilton, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Improving Kindergarteners’ Writing Self-Perception Elizabeth Auguste, College of William and Mary Facilitator: Terri Nicol Watson, The City College of New York (CUNY)

Thursday November 17, 2016 10:00am - 10:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

10:30am

10:30am

10:30am

10:30am

11:30am

UCEA Awards Luncheon
This luncheon was established to honor the recipients of UCEA Awards. The UCEA Awards focus on contributions to scholarship, teaching, student development, and the improvement of educational leadership preparation and practice. For a full list of current and past UCEA winners, please see the awards section of the UCEA website (www.ucea.org/opportunity_category/awards). This event is ticketed, and tickets are available for purchase at Registration.

Session Participants

Thursday November 17, 2016 11:30am - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Columbus

1:40pm

A Reunion of Mujeres Guerrilleras/Warrior Women: Latina Scholars Talk Life, Balance, & Leadership
The educational trajectory of Latinas is like passing through the eye of a needle. For every 100 Latinas who begin elementary school, 54 complete high school, eleven graduate college, four obtain graduate degrees, and less than one percent complete a doctorate. This session seeks to create support and research networks of Latina scholars. If we are to strengthen the pipeline into the professoriate for women of color, then Latina scholars must be supported and strengthened.


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

1:40pm

UCEA Interacts with a Detroit Youth-Oriented Community Action Organization
In many urban areas, there are active grassroots organizations, serving communities of color, that are highly successful in educating youth activists, challenging environmental injustice, organizing for change, providing an alternative education for students of color rejected by schools, etc. EMEAC (East Michigan Environmental Action Council) is just such an organization in Detroit. In this session, staff and students of EMEAC will join university faculty members in a discussion of the work they do in Detroit.


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

1:40pm

“In-between” District Capacity to Meet the Needs of Struggling Schools
Our Critical Conversation is designed for those interested in the challenges of school improvement in suburbs, smaller cities, and towns. Large urban school districts receive a substantial amount of popular and scholarly attention. Yet, the majority of the nation’s low-performing schools are in districts “in between” large urban and rural areas. We will explore research that foregrounds “in between” district capacity to meet the needs of low-performing schools and will sketch common research goals.


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

1:40pm

Evaluating Leadership Performance: 360-Degrees, Case Studies, and School-Based Performance Assessments
Participants:

Large-Scale Performance Assessment for Leaders in California: A Pilot Study. Margaret (Terry) Orr, Bank Street College; Liz Hollingworth, University of Iowa; Janice Cook, University of San Diego

The Performance Assessment for Leaders (PAL) is a performance-based assessment to evaluate the readiness of school leadership candidates for initial licensure. This new system allows principal candidates to demonstrate their leadership knowledge and skills based on actual experiences within their schools as part of a preparation pathway. This paper presents the results from the rst year of a pilot study with a principal preparation program in California.

Nothing New Under the Sun: Perceptions of a New Principal Evaluation Tool in Texas. Brenda Chacon, David DeMatthews, David Knight, Rodolfo Rincones (University of Texas at El Paso)

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) developed a new principal evaluation system called Texas Principal Evaluation and Support System (TPESS). TPESS is “designed to support principals in their professional development and help them improve as instructional leaders” (TEA, 2016). This study uses a qualitative multicase study approach to investigate how 5 principals make sense of the evaluation and whether or not the evaluation process contributes to their professional development.

The Relative Affordance of Performance Assessment: Analyzing Epistemologies, Logics, and Purposes. Jessica Charles, University of California, Berkeley

There is increasing consensus in the eld of leadership preparation that robust performance assessments are needed to capture and evaluate the complexity of school administrators’ professional work. This paper seeks to better understand the epistemological perspectives, logics, and purposes that undergird administrator performance assessment and to analyze how these affect the assessment design and assessment experience.

Using CALL to Grow High School Principals in a Rural School System. Leslie Hazle Bussey, Georgia Leadership Institute for School Improvement; Mark Blitz, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This investigation followed the growth of ve high school principals in a rural district toward
a disposition of self-directed learning and re ned school improvement leader practices. The principal development intervention used data from the Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL) instrument, which measures distributed leadership tasks. Scaffolded learning support was provided over 3 school years. Findings have implications for use of data to drive principal growth and effective partnership practice for principal development.




Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

1:40pm

Examining Educational Leadership and Policy in an International Context
Participants:

Mexican Indigenous Education and Neoliberal Reforms: Incommensurabilities and Inequities. Michael R. Scott, University of Texas at Austin

Despite an ongoing policy supporting the education of indigenous populations through heritage and bilingual education, the Mexican government imposed the ENLACE standardized testing program across the country for all students beginning in 2006. This critical longitudinal analysis of the 6 reported years of the ENLACE program for the public schools in Yucatan demonstrates that students in the indigenous schools performed signi cantly worse than their general education counterparts, alluding to differing principles between the two policies.

Resisting Globalization of Neoliberal Educational Accountability: Student Movements’ Impact on Educational Policy in Latin America. Michael P. O’Malley, Diana Barrera, Zane Wubbena (Texas State University)

This conceptual paper takes up the tools of critical policy analysis to map a relationship between the adoption of neoliberal educational policies in one Southern Cone nation and the globalization of an educational reform model. It further analyzes the impact of student social movements for educational equity on the generation of new national educational policies aimed at reversing neoliberal investments in favor of an expanding notion of K-12 and higher education as a common good.

Examining Practice Across International Policy Contexts: Organizational Roles and Distributed Leadership—the U.S. and Denmark. Marsha E. Modeste, Pennsylvania State University; Søren Buhl Hornskov, University College UCC, Denmark; Helle Bjerg, University College UCC, Denmark; Carolyn Kelley, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This study applies a distributed leadership framework in the comparative analysis of
data from teachers and leaders taking the Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL). While CALL was developed for schools in the U.S., the implementation
of recent reform policies in Denmark allows us to compare and contrast leadership practices and policies across both contexts. The purpose of this study is to examine how the implementation of current reforms impact Danish and U.S. schools.

School Leadership and Choice in Spain and the United States. Regina Rose Umpstead, Central Michigan University; Benjamin P. Jankens, Central Michigan University; Bruce Wells Umpstead, Central Michigan University; Pablo Ortega Gil, University of Alicante, Spain; Linda Weiss, Central Michigan University

This study examines alternative forms of public schooling in two countries as a means to promote choice and equitable outcomes for students. It compares the motivation for their creation and the key competitive features of centros concertados in Spain and charter schools in the U.S. The comparison offers important insights for school leaders regarding ways of structuring public school networks and choice features that are important to parents.




Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

1:40pm

From Debate to Sexting: Adolescent Social and Emotional Development
Participants:

Adolescents’ Perceptions of Sexual Relationships Between Students and Teachers: Implication for School Leadership. Frank Hernandez, Southern Methodist University; Jonathon McPhetres, University of Rochester

In this study high school students responded to four scenarios describing a relationship between a student and teacher. Results indicated when the student is older (18 vs. 16 or 14), the teacher is younger (21 vs. 30 or 40) and when the relationship is not explicitly exploitative, situations are perceived as less wrong and harmful and are less likely to be reported. Implications for future research, leadership, and policy are discussed.

Sexting Away Their Futures: The Legal Ramifications of Student Sexting. Joseph Oluwole, Montclair State University

In several states, students engaged in “sexting” could be violating child pornography
laws, and if convicted they could end up on sex offender lists. This article examines this thorny issue, arguing that, under the Free Speech Clause, students engaged in consensual sexting with other students similarly under the age of majority should not be automatically punished criminally or by schools. It discusses First Amendment implications and guidance for school of cials, policymakers, educators, and child advocates.

Social and Emotional Learning at the Middle Level: One School’s Journey. Barry Aidman, Texas State University; Peter Price, Austin Independent School District

A key challenge for 21st-century schools, families, and communities is to develop knowledgeable, responsible and caring students who are able to work well with others from diverse backgrounds in socially and emotionally skilled ways. This qualitative case study examines one middle school’s journey through the implementation of a Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) initiative. The case highlights key factors that contributed to the program’s success, lessons learned, and implications for school, district, and community leaders.

Successes and Challenges in Supporting Adolescents’ Argumentation Skills in Public Policy Discussions. Margaret Crocco, Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Amanda Marie Slaten Frasier, Lothar Konietzko, Nathan Riek (Michigan State University)

Both the College, Career, and Civic Life Framework for Social Studies State Standards and the Common Core State Standards in ELA/Literacy emphasize the importance of making reasoned arguments supported by evidence. Administrators play a critical role in supporting the effective teaching of argumentation. However, limited knowledge exists concerning how adolescents understand and use evidence in framing arguments. This project builds knowledge about how adolescents understand and use evidence when engaged in a public policy deliberation.



Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

1:40pm

Innovations in Educational Leadership Preparation
Participants:

Examining the Architecture of Leadership Coaching for Aspiring Principals. Shelby A. Cosner, Lisa Walker, Jason Swanson, Martha M. Hebert, Samuel Paul Whalen (University of Illinois at Chicago)

We report ndings from a longitudinal study that examines two cohorts of aspiring principals during an 18-month preparation experience to examine: (1) What are the key routines and tools utilized by leadership coaches that were consequential to the standards-aligned competency development of aspiring principals? (2) What relationships exist between coach structuring, routines, and tools and the learning processes that were engaged by coaches for the standards-aligned competency development of aspiring principals?

Monitoring and Assessing the Trajectory of Leadership Growth During the Clinical Residency. Jason Swanson, Paul Zavitkovsky (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Principal preparation programs continue to be criticized for lack of vision, purpose, and coherence. Four areas where programs most often misaligned are (a) recruitment and selection, (b) certi cation, (c) alignment of curriculum, and (d) instruction and assessment. The purpose of this paper is to describe how one principal preparation program is growing its own capacity to monitor and assess the trajectory of leadership growth during its clinical residency.

Redesigning Principal Preparation in Illinois: How Are Programs Implementing the State’s Ambitious New Principal Preparation Policy? Bradford White, Illinois Education Research Council; Amber Stitziel Pareja, University of Chicago Consortium on School Research; Brenda Klostermann, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville; Holly M. Hart, University of Chicago

This presentation summarizes the ndings from a 2-year, mixed methods study examining the implementation of a far-reaching new policy for preparing principals in Illinois. As the state has moved from “general administration” programs to principal-speci c training, the new policy has resulted in more collaborative partnerships with school districts, increased emphasis on instructional leadership and special student populations, and more rigorous and authentic internship experiences, but also sharp declines in enrollment and some degree of skepticism.

Leadership Coaching and Mentoring: A Research-Based Model. Julie Gray, University of West Florida

This paper proposes a research-based model for leadership preparation programs in order to more effectively prepare and support new school leaders in the eld and profession. This model supports early eld experiences and more opportunities for experiential learning in leadership roles. Educational leadership students would have more time to determine if their interest in leadership is authentic and realistic.




Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

1:40pm

Recruiting, Selecting, Developing, and Certifying New Leaders
Participants:

Creating an Online Learning Community—Research on Conducting Successful Online School Leadership Programs. Anna Sun, Rowan University

Guided by social, cognitive, and teaching presence (Garrison, 2007), this study is intended to examine the practices for successful online school leadership programs. The ndings indicate that it is essential to the successful operation of online leadership courses if a sense of community is built and sustained in online teaching and learning. To foster an online interactive practice, it is instrumental for instructors to create positive relationships between students and instructors.

Partnering for a Diverse Principal Preparation Pipeline. Jack Leonard, University of Massachusetts-Boston; Ceronne Daly, Boston Public Schools

In 2015, an urban district–university partnership designed a satellite in-district school leader preparation program that would speci cally target educators of color. This exploratory case study used documentary evidence, personal interviews, and survey data to illuminate the strategies that led to 88% diversity. More importantly, the data uncovered how race relates to subtle and often unintentional obstacles to diverse graduate student enrollments. The research is important for educational administration programs seeking to diversity their pools.

Uncharted Nature of Licensure Requirements for Charter School Principals: Implications and Possibilities for Policy Action. Samantha Lea Hedges, Indiana University; Anne-Maree Ruddy, Indiana University-Bloomington; Lori Boyland, Ball State University; Jeff Swensson, Ball State University

In this paper, we draw upon state policy documents and other public sources to review licensure requirements for charter school principals. The results indicate that few states have adopted speci c licensure requirements for charter school principals, and many exempt charter school principals from licensure altogether. These ndings have signi cant implications for policy-makers, charter school advocates, and charter school authorizers. These implications are discussed and related to the existing literature regarding principal licensure, preparation, and support.

Why Lead?: Exploring the Motivations of Aspiring Principals. Shannon Holder, Jennie Weiner (University of Connecticut)

This qualitative study of 9 aspiring turnaround principals aimed to uncover their motivations for becoming principals in turnaround schools and what these constructions can tell us about their views regarding the role of the principal. Participants presented three main narratives of why they wished to become turnaround principals. These narratives varied by participants’ identities and in their emphasis regarding an orientation towards equity and a focus on improvement and change.

“Not Convinced ‘These’ Students Meet Our Criteria”: Exclusive Graduate Education in Educational Administration Programs. Christa Boske, Kent State University; Chinasa Ada Elue, Kennesaw State University; Azadeh F. Osanloo, New Mexico State University; Whitney Sherman Newcomb, Virginia Commonwealth University

The call for more deliberate involvement in understanding graduate admissions arises
in regard to student attrition and retention concerns. Professors play an underexamined role as gatekeepers throughout the admissions process. This self-study explores how
three school leadership programs understand graduate admissions criteria, college-level diversity goals, and programmatic decision-making to make sense of admissions criteria and candidate selection. Findings suggest the need for a new holistic graduate admissions conceptual model to advance equity values and goals.




Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

1:40pm

Supporting Students through the P-20 Pipeline
Participants:

Preparing Students for College: An Exploratory Study of the Impact of High Rigor Coursework. Lee Morgan, University of Northern Colorado

This study examined participation in a rigorous secondary curriculum and the corresponding outcomes related to college enrollment, persistence, and graduation. A sample of students
from a suburban high school was used to test this hypothesis. The results confirmed a positive relationship between high-rigor courses and college success. This relationship was evident
even after controlling for relevant students’ demographics including gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. The academic bene ts of the high rigor course participation are discussed.

Effects of the UT Admission Cap on High School Students’ College Planning. Lolita Tabron, University of Denver

This study is an investigation of the effects of the University of Texas admission cap on a student’s likelihood of choosing a more rigorous (college-preparatory) high school diploma. Logistic regression models were used to share how the high school a student attended conferred important advantages or disadvantages regarding students’ educational planning and outcomes. Findings indicate that after the UT admission cap, students took less rigorous coursework to qualify for the Top 10% automatic admission guarantee.

Reimagining Precollege Programming for Overaged and Undercredited Students. Nakia M. Gray, New York University

Transfer high schools are charged with the task of preparing overaged, undercredited students for graduation and college. This purpose of this qualitative case study is to offer a perspective into how a transfer school leader in conjunction with community partnerships utilizes partnerships and precollege transition programs to rede ne college readiness and student success.

Fifth-Year Seniors: Persisting Versus Dropping Out. Gregory White, Michigan State University

This research explores why high school seniors who do not graduate on time persist in an effort to obtain a high school diploma instead of dropping out or seeking a GED, which is the more traditional trajectory. Structured interviews tease out underlying reasons for this divergence, interrogating personal and structural domains, while a nationally representative data set exposes this phenomenon on a national level.



Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

1:40pm

Healing as Resistance: Attending to Self Care During Oppressive Trauma -- Candidacy to the Professoriate
Suffering after suffering on your news feed? Hostility at your institution? Microaggressions at work? Drama at home? Really, who can be academic in these troubling times? We may want to take on the problems of the world, but self-care must come first for healing is an act of resistance! This session is designed for emerging to early scholars and focuses on the importance of self-care when you are faced with dealing with traumatic situations.


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

1:40pm

Julie Laible Memorial Session for New UCEA Jackson Scholars
First-year Jackson Scholars will gather with their Mentors to receive an orientation to the Jackson Scholars Network. After the orientation session, new Scholars and Mentors will meet to make connections and build relationships to support their Jackson Scholars experience. The Jackson Scholars program is a 2-year program that provides formal networking, mentoring, and professional development for graduate students of color who intend to become professors of educational leadership.


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

1:40pm

Advancing Scholarly Agendas of the CSLEE: A UCEA Center Sponsored Symposium
The Consortium for the Study of Leadership and Ethics in Education (CSLEE), a UCEA Program Center with affiliates across the world, is widely known for its signature annual event, the annual Values & Leadership Conference. The range and depth of scholarship, both theoretical and empirical, focuses on the philosophy of administrative leadership and closely related topics that continue to inform the field. This symposium draws together key pieces of scholarship as showcasing the Consortium’s reach.
Participants:
-When Policy and Practice Collide in Turbulent Times – Newly Arrived Students, a Challenge to the Educational System? Katarina Norberg, Umeå University, Sweden
-Leadership for student learning – What principals can do! Helene Karin Ärlestig, Umeå University; Olof CA Johansson, Umeå university Sweden
-Moral and Ethical Reasoning in Pre-Service Educational Leaders Keith Gurley, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Jennifer L. Greer, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Marcia O’Neal, University of Alabama at Birmingham
- Dewey 100: The Meaning of Democracy and Education in 2016 Steve Gross, Temple University; Joan Poliner Shapiro, Temple University


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

1:40pm

Advocates for Social Justice: Leaders, the Law, and Diverse Student Populations
This symposium will feature a discussion about how leaders can use the law to advocate for diverse student populations. Each paper examines a specific student group including: English Language Learners, pregnant and parenting students, homeless students, gifted and talented students, and black students at “No-excuses” charter schools. While most school leaders may want to be advocates for social justice, we will analyze whether they have the requisite legal training to effectively advocate for diverse students.


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

1:40pm

Deconstructing and Reconstructing Educational Leadership, Policy, and Practice in Increasingly Pluralistic School Contexts
In this symposium we discuss and offer new lenses for researching and practicing education within shifting contexts, using Arizona as an exemplar. Arizona’s schools’ challenges arise from sociopolitical and sociocultural tensions, which are increasingly prevalent in schools nationwide. We present four studies that focus on Arizona educators and students navigating, negotiating, and asserting (or silencing) their voices and identities amidst restrictive, colorblind policies and social/institutional structures, thus implying new approaches to education in complex contexts.
Participants:
-Rebuilding Trust between Latino Families and Schools in U.S.-Mexico Border Contexts Darcy Tessman, University of Arizona
-Set Up to Fail? The Systematic ‘Silencing’ of our Increasingly Multicultural Students Lisa Fetman, University of Arizona
-Schools as Communities: Contemporary Transformative Leadership in Educational Practice Linsay DeMartino, University of Arizona
-Towards Posthumanism: The Need for New Theory in Women’s Educational Leadership Erin Matyjasik, University of Arizona
Facilitator: Martin Scanlan, Marquette University / Boston College


Thursday November 17, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

3:00pm

Central Office Transformation: A shift in the role of district principal supervisors.
Questions regarding the role and organizational structure of central office administration in public school districts across the nation have recently come to light of high-stakes policy environments mandating enhanced student performance. Federal and state policy mandates have placed demands on school district central offices. This paper examines the perceptions of principals involved in central office transformation, specifically principal supervision, that focuses on developing assistive relationships, and further developing instructional leadership skills with central office leaders.

Session Participants
avatar for Becky Slothower

Becky Slothower

Educational Leadership & Policy Studies Ph.D. Doctoral Candidate, Oklahoma State University


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

3:00pm

Clinical Faculty: Critical Conversations About Promotion in the Academy
With an increase in the number of clinical faculty working in educational leadership, we propose to discuss issues related to promotion of clinical faculty within the complex space of the academy. How can the academy balance supporting educational revitalization while simultaneously honoring important time-honored traditions, such as the tenure system? In this session, we hope to stimulate dialogue and learn from each other to re-envision support for clinical faculty in the academy.


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

3:00pm

What To Do When Critical Conversations Don't Work
This critical conversation explores the question: How can school leaders address teachers’ deficit thinking when critical conversations, (i.e., courageous conversations, mindful reflection, etc.) do not work? Drawing from their research and experiences with students at the university and educators in the field, the presenters will engage participants in a discussion about self-capturing video. Used at a school site, this professional development approach was successful in revealing and reframing teachers’ deficit thinking and changing their practice.


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

3:00pm

Community Considerations for Educational Leadership
Participants:

The Impact of the Trauma-Sensitive Schools Approach on Educators. Cori Canty Woessner, University of Denver

This Ignite is a provocative, visual presentation of how the Trauma-Sensitive Schools approach impacts educator satisfaction and teacher self-ef cacy, as well as student outcomes. This approach is guided by attachment theory and the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study. Audience members will understand how school leadership effectively implements the Trauma- Sensitive Schools approach with educators in order to create school cultures in which educators feel safe enough to take instructional risks in the classroom.

Triple Whammies Impacting K-12 Leadership Preparation in the U.S. Tawannah Gail Allen, High Point University; Mariela A. Rodriguez, University of Texas at San Antonio; Carol A. Mullen, Virginia Tech

This session addresses how to prepare aspiring administrators attending minority-serving institutions to lead in the midst of changing demographics of America’s K-12 education landscape. Three maps, the racial typology of U.S. counties and the geographic locations of HBCUs and HSIs, when superimposed into one map, illustrate the alignment of MSIs in majority–minority populated areas. We explain how these areas are indicative of students experiencing signi cant cultural–generation gaps in their K–12 schooling experiences.

Gang Awareness and Classroom Educators. Maya Suzuki Daniels, Loyola Marymount University

Gangs and schools have co-existed in the same areas of South Central Los Angeles for almost 50 years. Yet teachers receive little to no training on gangs in the area. This leaves both students and teachers in positions of great powerlessness. Furthermore, this oversight violates Section 51624 of the California Education Code. This presentation elucidates a potential solution to these issues in the form of community-based gang awareness trainings for educators.

Educational Leadership Beyond School Walls: Engaging Immigrant Latino Families by Learning From Community-Based Initiatives. Elizabeth Gil, Michigan State University

Educational leaders can tap into existing community-based ties of the increasingly diverse populations of students and families they serve. They can re-envision leadership by looking beyond school walls in order to better understand and connect with their schools’ students and families. This presentation encourages leaders to refresh practice by learning from effective practices community-based initiatives implement to engage their constituents and invites leaders to rede ne student success by considering holistic aspects of students’ schooling experiences.

Cross-Sector Collaboration to Address Chronic Absenteeism. Joshua Childs, University of Texas at Austin

The Ignite session will explore how chronic absenteeism is a critical educational issue that schools and districts should focus on in order to improve educational outcomes
and experiences for their students. The session will highlight the importance of chronic absenteeism, discuss how a countywide multi-agency approach can help to engage stakeholders, and how leaders with the support of multiple organizations can implement policy changes at the school and district level around chronic absenteeism.




Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

3:00pm

Contextual Issues and Challenges for Principals in High Needs Schools
This session will focus on recent research and development activities being conducted by members of the high-need schools international project team (ISLDN). This session will focus on contextual issues and challenging that impact on principal leadership and practices that affect student performance. Four multi-perspective case studies will be presented – two case studies from the USA, one each from Sweden and NZ. This will provide a snap shot of findings to this point.
Participants:

Key Leadership Practices in a Successful Turnaround Urban High-Needs K-8 Charter School in an Inner City Midwestern City (USA). Mette Lise Baran, Glady Van Harpen (Cardinal Stritch University)

The researchers will share ndings from a qualitative case study investigating key leadership practices considered to be vital in a successful turnaround of an urban high- needs K-8 charter school in a midwestern U.S. inner city. Findings reveal successful school leadership involves an unalterable commitment to the mission, vision, and goals unique
to the school. The principal and the leadership team promoted a culture of teaching and learning that placed a balanced focus on academics and character building or character development within the school and supporting community. High expectations and unwavering academic focus were demanded of everyone: Teachers, students, staff, and parents as stakeholders clearly understood the tremendous challenges in turning around a failing school. A proactive approach to “sweating the small stuff” places great emphasis on character building and fostering a sense of self-ef cacy in students and a mindset that they are responsible for chartering their own successful path.

The Role of District Level Leaders and Principals in a High Need Swedish School (Sweden). Olof Johansson, Monika Törnsén (Umeå University, Sweden)

This qualitative longitudinal study, conducted between 2013 and 2015, examines how district level leaders and principals in a suburban municipality with a diverse population confront the realities of working in a low-performing, high-need primary and secondary school, strongly affected by the dif culties in their students’ lives, and dealing with high principal and teacher turnover. We share ndings concerning district leader strategies and the leadership strategies of a new principal. The district leaders re a principal and create urgency to enforce necessary changes. The principal works actively with structural changes, to change the culture and build trust in her as the leader. The Swedish Schools Inspectorate reports severe criticism, parallel to emerging signs of increased organizational trust, teacher self-ef cacy, and a growing focus on issues concerning teaching and learning.

Leaders’ Perspectives on Sustaining Academic Success in a High-Needs School (Texas, USA). Bruce Barnett, Nathern Okilwa (University of Texas at San Antonio)

Schools situated in high-need contexts pose signi cant challenges to local educational agencies as well as the state and other stakeholders. These schools are usually majority-minority students, economically disadvantaged, and low performing with a high mobility rate and high turnover of teachers and administrators. When one such school de es the odds by transforming its culture coupled with achieving academic excellence, it attracts a great deal of interest. Often the focus turns to the school leadership—what are they doing differently? This is the case of Robbins Elementary School located in an urban setting in a major city in Texas. Robbins ES has excelled academically over the past 20 years despite all the factors that suggest it should be low performing. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine how Robbins ES has sustained high academic performance over the years. To achieve this goal we are particularly interested in studying the four principals who have been part of the success, dating back to 1993.

Teacher Leadership for Social Justice and Cultural Pluralism in Early Childhood Education: Three Cases From New Zealand With Implications for the U.S. (New Zealand). Stephen Louis Jacobson, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Geoffrey “Ross” Notman, University of Otago

With renewed policy interest in early childhood education (ECE) as an ef cient and effective approach to improving school success, this study explores the three case studies in New Zealand that have implications for the U.S. The study investigates teacher leadership practices in three ECE programs serving diverse communities in high needs areas in NZ. In terms of international relevance, NZ is a nation that promotes cultural pluralism with its indigenous population and growing Asian population. After exploring the national context in relation to the attainment of the Mario population, and the curriculum that is designed to enable children (and their families) to learn and grow through self-determination, the paper identi es strategies developed and implemented by ECE leaders that met the speci c needs of parent and students and built community competencies. The paper outlines policy considerations about the role of ECE teacher leadership for social justice and cultural pluralism, both in NZ and the U.S.




Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

3:00pm

Effective Use of Data to Improve Schooling
Participants:

Disaggregating Data to Inform Instruction? An Analysis of Data Practices of Principals in Three Districts. Rachel Roegman, Ala Samarapungavan, Yukiko Maeda (Purdue University)

In this study, we examine principals’ beliefs and practices around using disaggregated data to inform instruction. Data sources include interviews and surveys with nine principals from three districts. We draw on sensemaking theory to consider how principals make sense of data and how their practices and beliefs inform teachers’ sensemaking. Findings show a lack of disaggregation and a lack of sense of need for disaggregation across the districts, with implications for policy, practice, and preparation.

What’s on Your Dashboard? A Study of Successful Data Dashboard Development in a Large Urban District. Daniel Alexander Novak, University of Washington; Meredith I. Honig, University of Washington; Steven Gering, Spokane Public Schools

School districts across the country are investing in systems to help them to use data effectively to inform their teaching and learning improvement efforts. But often, the design of their data dashboards impedes such efforts. What does it look like when such dashboards support effective data use? Findings from a large urban district emphasize the importance of designing data dashboards in ways that scaffold users’ thinking and inquiry through the design of the technology.

Mind the Gap: How School Leaders Respond to Gaps in Available Data When Making Decisions. Lydia Rose Rainey, University of Washington

This paper presents ndings from a study of how leaders in two schools responded to the gaps in available data while trying to use data in their school improvement decision making. Findings suggest that gaps in data stem from an overemphasis on student-level data in district-provided data. Leaders confronted these gaps by using school-level resources to collect additional data and evidence or by using their own knowledge/expertise in place of data.

Relations Between Improvement Practices and Accountability Tools in New York City’s Children First Networks. Kelly McMahon, Northwestern University

In this article, I describe how support providers in New York City, referred to as Children First Networks, attempted to negotiate mutual partnerships with schools focused on improving student achievement and developing schools’ continuous improvement capabilities. Drawing on sociocultural theory as an analytic lens, I found the networks pushed accountability tools as improvement practices. The comparison approaches shows vastly different conceptions of improvement practices related to accountability designs.



Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

3:00pm

Leveraging Technology for Leadership Development and Enactment
Participants:

A Conceptual Framework of Leadership in Technology for Social Justice: A Metanarrative Review Kenneth E. Graves, Alex J. Bowers (Teachers College, Columbia University)

The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of literature on leadership and technology for social justice in order to summarize and to synthesize the ndings into a new integrated leadership framework for school technology leadership for social justice. After reviewing over 100 studies, preliminary ndings indicate that the most researched themes are technology leadership as shared responsibility and leader content knowledge around technology and media literacy.

Facilitating Administrators’ Instructional Leadership Through the Use of a Technology Integration Discussion Protocol. Scott Christopher McLeod, University of Colorado-Denver

Too often technology integration efforts by educators replicate rather than transform traditional instructional practices. Administrators’ use of a targeted discussion protocol can be helpful for facilitating analysis and revision of educators’ technology-infused lessons and units. This article describes how administrators in schools and preservice preparation programs can utilize such a protocol to enhance their instructional leadership and foster the success of their schools’ technology integration and implementation efforts.

Impacts on Practioner-Scholars of Participation in the Collaborative Authorship of Educational Leadership Simulations. Eric R. Bernstein, University of Connecticut; Michael Johanek, University of Pennsylvania; Wilbur Parker, Bowie State University; Joe Mazza, University of Pennsylvania

This study explores the experiences of practioner-authors of web-based leadership micro simulations based on their actual problems of practice. The project utilizes an inquiry-based and re ective practice approach to authoring and the simulations are designed to be utilized by groups of school leaders to collaborate in the construction of new knowledge around leadership praxis. This study explores the impact that participation has on the practitioner-scholars who are serving as simulation authors.

Media and its Pedagogical Implications: Understanding Leadership As/Through Mediational Praxis. Patrick M. Jenlink, Stephen F. Austin State University

Preparing educational leaders for today’s schools is challenged by a “social imaginary” of what education, schools, and educational leadership represent to the public. The purpose of this study was to examine the pedagogical implications of using popular culture media texts as curricular and pedagogical mediums for understanding day-to-day leadership challenges. Popular culture media plays an important role in the production of cultural politics via popular culture “texts” such as lms and television programs.

School Leaders and Twitter: Examining Practices in Twitter Chats. Lesley Y. Pendleton, Gwinnett County Schools; Nicholas J. Sauers, Georgia State University

Twitter has surpassed its original purpose as a system for communicating short updates to a
small group. Its exibility as a social network, as well as an information network, makes Twitter
a resource that school leaders may use to connect, share, and learn from others. This research explores how school leaders interact, within the context of a Twitter chat, to determine if they are consistent with the characteristics of a community of practice.




Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

3:00pm

Shaping the Culture and Climate of Learning
Participants:

How Principals Use Narrative to Foster a Culture of Learning and Promote Positive Change. Barry Aidman, Texas State University

Stories have the potential to help people connect, develop genuine understanding, and unite around common purposes. This paper reports the results of a qualitative case study that examines if, how, when, and why principals intentionally use stories as a leadership strategy. Preliminary results indicate that many principals use storytelling purposefully in order to develop relationships, build community, promote a culture of improvement, clarify key expectations, and support positive change.

School Leaders’ Influence on Student Learning Mediated by Academic Culture. Kenneth Leithwood, OISE-University of Toronto; Jingping Sun, University of Alabama

The purpose of the study was to test two hypotheses: (a) three observed variables, academic press, disciplinary climate, and teachers’ use of instructional time, will come together to create the latent construct Academic Culture (AC), and (b) school leadership has signi cant indirect effects on student learning through AC. A confirmatory factor analysis and a simultaneous structural equation model applied to the survey data collected in 2012 from 856 elementary school teachers con rmed the two hypotheses.

From Teacher Self-Regulatory Climate to Student Self-Regulatory Climate: Principal Effects on Learning Conditions. Jordan Ware, Timothy G. Ford (University of Oklahoma)

Self-determination theory posits that humans thrive in environments that support the satisfaction of their innate psychological needs. In order to create and sustain thriving schools, principals must seek to support these needs in teachers and students. Results showed principals have strong effects on learning conditions when they support the needs of teachers, who then feel more ef cacious as a staff, making them more likely to use instructional strategies and approaches that support student psychological needs.

An Exploration of a Principal’s Professional Identities and Their Relationship to School Climate. Rodney S. Whiteman, Gary Crow (Indiana University)

This empirical paper reports on a study of an elementary school principal’s professional identities and ways in which he perceives his identities relating to school climate. We used a qualitative interpretive study design, analyzing data through inductive content analysis to identify the principal’s salient professional identities and ways in which the presentation of those identities related to perceptions of school climate and success. Findings suggest a relationship between perceptions of identities and school climate.




Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

3:00pm

Teacher Leadership: Bridging Leadership and Learning
Participants:

Beyond “Teacher Heroes” and “Mint Officers”: Teacher Leadership Development in Complex Contexts. Jonathan Eckert, Wheaton College

Schools are complex organizations requiring teacher leadership development that relies on more than teacher heroes and delegated work. Using literature on teacher leadership, work redesign, and organizational leadership, we have created a model of teacher leadership development. That model is the lens for a descriptive analysis of three high school case studies in addition to interviews of recognized teacher leaders from across the U.S. with implications for future development.

Examining the Blind Spots: Integrating Teacher Leadership and Instructional Leadership Research. Douglas M. Wieczorek, Iowa State University; Jeffrey Charles Lear, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

The purpose of this systematic review of the literature is to synthesize three research perspectives providing empirical evidence for direction on the future knowledge development on the instructional leadership research construct. Our review identi es signi cant gaps in understandings about teacher leadership, framed by successful instructional leadership practices known to bene t school improvement efforts in all contexts.

The Sensemaking Experience of Newly Appointed District Teacher Leader Coordinators: A Case Study. Jill Janes, University of Kentucky

Iowa policymakers enacted a statewide teacher leadership initiative in 2013. This case study examined how district-level teacher leader coordinators came to understand their role as leaders. Data were collected through interviews, observations, and document reviews. Participants included district-level teacher leader coordinators and supporting regional leaders. Preliminary ndings reveal coordinators were guided through formal policy guidance and informal interactions. Coordinators enacted leadership roles in a bridge building capacity, linking others to resources and modeling leadership processes.

Open the Black Box of Distributed Leadership. Yan Liu, Susan M. Printy (Michigan State University)

The current body of literature does not include rigorous quantitative studies measuring whether people from different levels of school con gurations take on various leadership functions, and how frequent and intensely they are involved in each of the leadership roles. Using TALIS 2013 data, this research try to measure how formal and informal leaders are involved in different leadership responsibilities, and how the pattern varies from school to school and from country to country.




Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

3:00pm

The Ever-Expanding Role of School Principals: Examining Roles, Expectations, and Time Use
Participants:

Role Negotiation and Compromise: The Micropolitics of Expanding Principal Roles. Kimberly LeChasseur, Morgaen Donaldson, Jeremy B. Landa (University of Connecticut)

This paper examines the micropolitics of expanding principal roles beyond schools. We conducted interviews and observations over 2 years with a group of principals enacting
a new role, network facilitator. We explore the converging and conflicting interests
of principals and central administration and the ways network facilitators negotiated authority and role boundaries. Emerging themes related to sources of tension, resistance, sharing power, and brokering strategies suggest lessons for districts implementing peer-led professional development for principals.

A Systematic Review of Principal Time Use Research Sampling and Observation Periods. Craig Hochbein, Abby S. Mahone, Sara Catharine Vanderbeck (Lehigh University)

For more than 100 years, educators, policymakers, and researchers have been concerned with how principals spend their time. Understanding the relationships between how principals allot their time and educational outcomes could improve principal training, selection, development, and evaluation. The purpose of this study is to review principal time use research to identify potential external validity threats. Findings suggest substantial gaps in the development of principal samples and observation periods.

A New Perspective for Understanding Principals’ Role: Principals’ Boundary Activities and School Management Team Effectiveness. Pascale Sarah Benoliel, Bar Ilan University; Anit Somech, University of Haifa

Senior management teams (SMTs), an expression of a formal management structure of distributed leadership, may imply a signi cant change in principals’ role. This study inquiries into the boundary activities of principals toward their SMTs. Structural equation model results from a sample of 92 schools indicate that principals’ boundary activities enhance SMT effectiveness. Fostering relationship building among SMT members but also between SMT and external stakeholders, enhancing collaborative processes, remains fundamental to SMT effectiveness

Role Ambiguity in Expanded Roles for School Leaders. Morgaen Donaldson, Kimberly LeChasseur (University of Connecticut)

Although expanded roles for teachers have been the subject of much research, few studies have explored new roles for school leaders. In a growing number of districts, principals are taking on such roles, however. Our paper examines expanded roles for school administrators in the New Haven (CT) Public Schools. Using 2 years of interview data with 20 leaders, we nd that role ambiguity was related to the enactment and experience of the roles.



Session Participants
avatar for Sue Feldman

Sue Feldman

Ass Professor, Lewis and Clark College Graduate School
Equity-focused leadership at the school and district level. | Teacher leadership | Networks | Science Education


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

3:00pm

Developing Principal Supervisors to Foster Leadership Effectiveness: A Wallace Sponsored Session
In this session, leaders from the Tulsa Public School District and the University of Oklahoma will discuss how the role of principal supervisor in Tulsa has evolved to better support principals as effective school leaders as part of The Wallace Foundation’s Principal Supervisor Initiative. Session participants will discuss the rationale for the program, how it evolved, how the innovation has influenced the quality of the district’s leadership cadre, and the opportunities and challenges involved in implementing this innovation. Participants will also discuss implications for the role of university leadership programs, both with regard to developing principal supervisors and researching this new area of innovation.


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

3:00pm

Navigating the Shift to Intensive Principal Preparation in Illinois
In 2010, Illinois became one of the first states to legislatively require a complete redesign of principal preparation programs in the state with the goal of advancing statewide school improvement through strengthening school leadership. This session will describe the successes and challenges in implementing this ambitious state-wide effort. Session participants will highlight the radical shift in practice demanded of principal preparation programs, the sustainability of this effort in Illinois and lessons for other states seeking to strengthen principal preparation standards. It will also feature videos from The Wallace Foundation documenting the Illinois redesign requirements and the involvement of university partners from UIC.


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

3:00pm

“Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda . . .”: What We Wish We Had Known Before Becoming a Professor
This session will provide an opportunity for graduate students to talk openly with faculty about successfully transitioning to and fostering successful careers in academe. Panelists will share insights from their own experiences and also entertain questions from the audience. This informal conversation will focus on issues graduate students should think about in preparation for the academic job market.


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

3:00pm

Bridging Educational Leadership Studies and Curriculum Theory/Didaktik for Understanding Complex Times and Contexts
This symposium engages educational leadership and curriculum scholars from the US and Nordic countries / Europe in a cross-national dialogue on leadership and curriculum theory/Didaktik in research, practice, and preparation in the contemporary situation (e.g. globalization, neoliberalism, cosmopolitanism). Participant consider possibilities for bridging curriculum theory and leadership studies in a new framework.
Participants:
-Preparing School Leaders: Standards-Based Curriculum in the United States Michelle D. Young, University of Virginia; Erin Anderson, University of Denver; Angel M Nash, University of Virginia
-School Leadership and Curriculum - German Perspectives Stephan Huber, N/A; Pierre Tulowitzki, Pädagogische Hochschule Zug; Uwe Hameyer, N/A
-Reading and Revising History: Educational Leadership as Currere Ira Bogotch, Florida Atlantic University; Daniel Reyes Guerra, N/A
-Curriculum and Teacher Leadership Development Daniel Castner, Kent State University; Jennifer Schneider, Kent State University; James George Henderson, N/A
- A Framework for Bridging Curriculum Theory/Didaktik with Educational Leadership Studies: Discursive Educational Leadership Rose Ylimaki, University of Arizona; Michael Uljens, Åbo Akademi University


Thursday November 17, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

4:20pm

4:20pm

UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership: Why internationalism is essential to educational administration
UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership’s designated session brings together past and present associate directors of international affairs at UCEA, Stephen Jacobson and Bruce Barnett to hold a “state of the art” assessment and lay out next steps. The purpose of this conversation will center on revitalizing, re-envisioning and redefining UCEA’s educational leadership efforts. CISSL co-directors facilitate this critical conversation where conference participants discuss anew how to internationalize UCEA.


Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

4:20pm

Digital Simulation Cases and Games: UCEA Program Center for the Study of Technology and Leadership in Education (CASTLE)
Open educational resource are becoming increasingly prevalent in the field of educational leadership. Given the growth of online courses in the field,they offer great potential value to UCEA member institutions’ faculty. This interactive, innovative UCEA Program Center session will allow presenters the opportunity to share digital simulations, digital games, or digital cases and highlight the role they might play in educational leadership preparation programs.


Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

4:20pm

Leadership Practice and Accountability Policy: Lessons from the U.S., Denmark, Finland and Sweden
Nordic countries have strong traditions of commitment to democratic values, collaboration, and individual enlightenment that shape the culture of schools and the implementation of educational policies. The purpose of this international community-building session is to explore the goals of U.S.-style accountability policies that have been adopted by policymakers in Nordic countries, and to examine distributed leadership practices that emerge as a result of these policies and their application in these cultural contexts. Participant: Distributed Leadership Practice and Accountability Policy: Lessons from Comparative Research in the U.S. and Denmark, Finland and Sweden Carolyn Kelley, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Rose Ylimaki, University of Arizona; Richard Halverson, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Marsha E. Modeste, Pennsylvania State University; Olof CA Johansson, Umeå university Sweden; Helle Bjerg, University of College Capital; Søren Buhl Hornskov, University College UCC; Michael Uljens, Åbo Akademi University Nordic countries have strong traditions of commitment to democratic values, collaboration, and individual enlightenment that shape the culture of schools and the implementation of educational policies. The purpose of this international community-building session is to explore the goals of U.S.-style accountability policies that have been adopted by policymakers in Nordic countries, and to examine distributed leadership practices that emerge from the application of these accountability policies to the cultural values that shape the response of educators in the U.S. and Nordic countries. Facilitator: Carolyn Kelley, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

4:20pm

Cultural Influences on Sense-Making in Education
Participants:

Black Educational Leadership: Cultivating and Employing Indigenous Capital in a Crisis. Ijeoma Ononuju, University of California, Davis

This paper looks at two secondary Indigenous Black male administrators who employed their indigenous capital to create an environment of healing that blurred the boundary between school and community. As a result, the school became a site of community unity and resistance against youth violence. The paper also provides a definition for indigenous capital and its value in supporting educational and community revitalization in a predominately Black and Brown community.

Building Pathways: Nurturing a Female Generation of School Leaders in China. Lixia Qin, Mario S. Torres, Jean Madsen (Texas A&M University)

This paper probes one of largely overlooked aspects in educational leadership of China: women’s leadership roles in education and young women’s leadership preparation. Drawing from published data, literature, and the data collected by the authors, the paper provides an overview of women’s leadership roles in education and the barriers to young women’s leadership aspirations, highlights gaps in young females’ leadership preparation in China, and identifies the implications for future research and practice.

Deconstructing Macroaggressions and Microaggressions: A Conceptual Model Promoting Sense- Making in Education. Azadeh F. Osanloo, New Mexico State University; Christa Boske, Kent State University; Whitney Sherman Newcomb, Virginia Commonwealth University

We explore the interconnectivity of intercultural and multicultural education theory and practice through a new conceptual model (i.e., Micro/Macroaggression Ecological Conceptual Model) focusing on the intersections of dominant norms and values, macro/microaggressions, social justice pedagogies, and sense-making. The theoretical reasoning is anchored in our conceptualization suggesting the extent we fail to adjust ways of understanding may perpetuate unintentional, oppressive ways of knowing.

Re-Envisioning Cultural Competence Beyond Diversity Representation: African American Administrators’ Experiences in Organizational Decision Making. Kendra Lowery, Ball State University

This multiple case study examines the ways in which African American administrators who were the rst hired in four northern school districts navigated challenges and worked to be included in organizational decision-making that went beyond simply being hired as a representation of diversity, as in tokenism (Yoder, 1991), and illustrated their substantive inclusion in core school district decisions.



Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

4:20pm

Educators' Roles in Building a Culture of Academic Success
Participants:

A Study of Bilingual Teacher Identity Development Within a Language and Cultural Revitalization Project. Brenda Rubio, University of Texas at Austin

This ethnographic study examines the motivations bilingual Latina/o educators have to seek
out and participate in alternative educational spaces outside school that promote the curricular recognition of alternative epistemologies and pedagogies to foster students’ race, cultures, and languages. This work may help those involved in policy making to better understand the need for inclusive, culturally rich educational space and curriculum for Latina/o teachers and to uncover holistic ways to support bilingual educators.

Establishing a Culture of Reading for African American Students: Rural Principals’ Response. Brandolyn E. Jones, Lone Star College-Kingwood

This qualitative case study explores how rural elementary principals in southeast Texas in uence the reading development of their African American students. Findings revealed that African American student reading development within a rural school context was influenced by a synergistic system, which can operate unbeknownst to the campus principal or as supported directly by the campus principal. This study concludes with a proposed leadership support model for teaching reading to African American students in rural schools.

Race Matters: A Teacher-Research Study on Developing Racial Literacy in Urban Youth. Van Lac, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Institutionalized racism permeates the fabric of American society. Without cultivating racial literacy skills (Guiner, 2004), society remains ill equipped to effectively address racial injustice. This self-study explores one teacher’s development of a critical race pedagogy curriculum to strengthen and nurture racial literacy among a diverse group of urban youth in an after-school program. Preliminary ndings highlight the challenges this teacher-researcher faced when moving from theory to practice in critical race pedagogy work.

Examining the Culture of Academic Success at a Girls-Only National High School in Kenya. Nathern Okilwa, University of Texas at San Antonio

Educating girls in most developing countries is elusive because of the many barriers, including early-forced marriage, female genital mutilation, susceptibility to violence and certain diseases, gender discrimination/stereotyping, and negative classroom environments. Kenya has fared well in educating girls through girls-only boarding schools. The purpose of this study is to examine the culture of academic success at one national girls-only school. This study centers on the contribution of the school leadership to this success.




Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

4:20pm

International and Comparative Perspectives on Instructional Leadership
Participants:

Feasibility of Increasing Access: How Does Instructional Leadership In uence Opportunity to Learn in U.S. and Belgium? Angela Urick, Timothy G. Ford, Alison Shelby Page Wilson, William C. Frick (University of Oklahoma)

Opportunity to learn is a policy lever used to study inequitable student access to curriculum and instruction and address opportunity gaps for economically disadvantaged students. Principals are in a unique position to implement these efforts through coordination of the instructional program. This study uses 2011 TIMSS to understand how leadership increases math achievement through opportunity to learn in the U.S. and Belgium that have similar tracking issues yet different distributions of wealth and policy contexts.

Instructional Leadership Practices in Israeli and USA Jewish Educational Systems. Haim Shaked, Bar Ilan University; Jeffrey Glanz, Yeshiva University; Chanina Rabinowitz, Michlala College; Shmuel Shenhav, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Research outside USA public school settings into the principal’s role as instructional leader is limited. Speci cally, instructional leadership practices of principals in Israeli and USA Jewish schools have been unexplored. This study aims to narrow this gap. Data were collected from 94 Israeli principals and 93 USA Jewish schools’ principals. Findings indicate that USA Jewish schools’ principals demonstrated higher level of instructional leadership. In both groups, women principals demonstrated higher level of instructional leadership.

Revisiting the Effect of Instructional and Transformational Leadership on Student Outcomes. Paula Kwan, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Transformational leadership and instructional leadership are portrayed as disparate practices. The recent conclusion in some meta-analyses that the effect of instructional leadership practices on student learning is considerably greater than that of transformational leadership has further accentuated their apparently incompatible nature. This study argues and con rms that the augmentative effect of these two practices on student learning; transformational leadership is an important base on which instructional leadership can be effectively enacted for improving student learning.

School Leadership During Curriculum Implementation: Case Study of Intersection Between Structure and Agency in Indonesia. Asih Asikin-Garmager, University of Iowa

The purpose of this study is to develop a theory on the relationship between existing structure and the principals’ leadership practices through the use of case study research for theory development. The overarching research question guiding this study is how does structure in uence principals’ leadership practices? Preliminary data analysis indicates that government regulations and expectations delimit the leadership practices of the principal at Setia Budi school, leaving her little room to express her agency.




Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

4:20pm

Leadership, Advocacy, and Social Justice
Participants:

Between Individual Accountability and Social Responsibility: Leadership as Mediating Praxis Against Social Injustices in Education. Patrick M. Jenlink, Stephen F. Austin State University

The purpose of this study was to examine the nature of social injustices as metanarrative in educational settings and the positioning of educational leadership as mediational praxis and counternarrative against injustices. The study focused on what constitutes social injustices in the educational setting and the intersection between injustice and social justice praxis. Narratives, as “social injustice” and “mediational” texts, were analyzed for language and action within/across discourse, illuminating patterns and relationships.

Social Justice Advocacy: Are Administrator Candidates Prepared to Lead? Bobbie Plough, Margaret Harris, Ardella Dailey, Peg Winkelman (California State University, East Bay)

Education in the 21st century requires school leaders who embrace school leadership for social justice to ensure all students are provided with equal access to a high quality education. This research represents a critical look at a department of educational leadership’s endeavor to assess candidates’ acquisition of leadership knowledge and skills, as de ned by the California Administrator Performance Expectations (CAPEs), concomitantly with the department’s mission to support the development of educational leaders for social justice.

The Principal as an Advocate. Tameka LaTrece Osabutey-Aguedje, Georgia State University

The purpose of this study is to examine characteristics of leadership in a high-needs, high- performing school through the voices of a principal, teachers, other leaders, and parents who interact within that context every day. Drawing on the distributed leadership theory, this study uses open coding case study methods to analyze interviews, artifacts, and publicity materials. The rationale is to explore personalized descriptions of experiences that contribute to developing a learning culture community.




Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

4:20pm

School Turnaround: Myths and Lessons
Participants:

Imperfect Lessons: School Culture, Ambitious Instruction, and the Messy Process of Improvement. Jessica G. Rigby, University of Washington; Julie Ray, Federal Way Public Schools; James Crawford, Federal Way Public Schools; Cindy Dracobly, Federal Way Public Schools

School culture is thought of to be at the heart of organizational conditions. Yet, what makes a strong school culture in service of improvement of ambitious instruction? In this study we examine the strategic leadership actions of three principals to create conditions in which their teachers take risks, make their practice public, and persevere through many challenging lessons. The principals tell their stories; systematic qualitative analyses were done in collaboration of the researcher and principals.

Disrupting the Myths of School Turnaround. Ulrich C. (Rick) Reitzug, Kimberly Kappler Hewitt (University of North Carolina at Greensboro)

In this paper, we draw upon our empirical research and extant scholarship on turnaround, leadership, change, and contemporary sociopolitical conditions to present and disrupt four myths about school turnaround. Data from our empirical research on turnaround provide illustrative and clarifying examples. Our purpose in the paper is not simply to deconstruct turnaround, but also to propose how turnaround might be reconstructed in a more moral, feasible, and sustainable fashion.

Five Myths of School Turnaround That Must Be Remedied for Meaningful, Lasting Change. Coby Meyers, University of Virginia; Mark A. Smylie, University of Illinois at Chicago

Despite the intensity of funding and numerous intervention efforts in recent school turnaround initiatives, many perspectives, practices, and policies speci c to school turnaround appear to be at odds with organizational theory. In this paper, we identify
ve myths of school turnaround perpetuated by policy and practice that can often inhibit dramatic positive change in our nation’s lowest-performing schools. We conclude by suggesting alternative ways forward that are better aligned with organization change theory and research.

Clinical Scholarship: Myth of the Super Hero: Developing Muscle Memory for Turnaround Leaders. Doris Candelarie, Susan Korach, Ellen Miller-Brown (University of Denver)

This paper will explore the intersections of university learning, authentic leadership practice, and community engagement the graduates from the University of Denver’s Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (ELPS) department experience. These intersections will be illustrated through vignettes from graduates that detail how they facilitate the necessary magnitude of change and manage the outside pressures to lead their schools to signi cant improvement while holding true to transformative leadership practices that they learned during their preparation program.




Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

4:20pm

Social-Emotional Approaches to School Leadership

Participants:
Strategies for Improving School Culture: Creating Supportive Spaces for Black and Latino Young Men. Adriana Villavicencio, New York University

Improving school culture is increasingly seen not only as valuable in and of itself, but also as a viable pathway for raising student achievement. Yet many schools struggle to create a welcoming and supportive schoolwide culture. This paper highlights the efforts of school leaders to (a) develop culturally relevant education, (b) adopt restorative approaches to discipline, (c) promote strong in-school relationships, and (d) provide early support for students’ postsecondary goals.

The Role of Principal Optimism and Organizational Commitment in the Learning Values–Team OCB Relationship. Ronit Bogler, Open University of Israel; Anit Somech, University of Haifa

The study aims at examining the mediating role of organizational commitment in the relationship between learning values and team organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and the effect of the principal’s optimism on this relationship. Eighty-two management teams of Israeli elementary schools were studied involving 395 participants. Overall, the results con rmed the mediating role of organizational commitment between learning values and team OCB and the interaction effect of principal’s optimism and learning values on team OCB.

Encouraging the Heart: Care as a Key Element of School Leadership. Jennie Weiner, University of Connecticut; Tiffany Squires, Syracuse University

Using sensemaking theory as a guiding framework, this qualitative interview study explores how a group of school leaders used the concept of care to guide their practice and facilitate externally mandated changes within a complex school setting. Speci cally, due to its centrality with regard to making connections and forming relationships with the school community, participants came to view care as essential to their success in their role as school leaders.

School Leaders’ In uence on Student Learning Mediated by Teacher Emotions. Jingping Sun, University of Alabama; Kenneth Leithwood, OISE-University of Toronto

The purpose of the study was to test two hypotheses: (a) three observed variables, teacher trust, teacher collective ef cacy, and teacher sense of collaborative community, will come together
to form the latent construct Teacher Emotions (TE), and (b) school leadership has signi cant indirect effects on student learning through TE. A con rmatory factor analysis and a simultaneous structural equation model applied to the survey data collected in 2012 from 856 school teachers con rmed the two hypotheses.





Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

4:20pm

Graduate Writing Ignite!: Tips for Crafting Your Best Work
This session is designed to give quick tips on crafting your best writing work. You will hear from faculty and graduate students at various points in their development as researchers and writers and learn about the different strategies and styles to the writing process they employ to get it right. Our goal is that you will begin thinking about your own writing techniques and style!


Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

4:20pm

UCEA Policy Associates Policy Brief Writing Workshop
In this working session, selected students will join a team of senior scholars who are engaged in UCEA policy efforts to develop and refine policy briefs around a set of pre-determined policy issues relevant to the preparation of educational leaders. Participation in the session requires a pre-application, which involves the review of policy interests, and assigned pre-work. Specifically, by participating, students will have the opportunity to collaborate with esteemed senior scholars to (1) track current policy efforts across the US, (2) co-author policy briefs, and (3) co-author rapid responses to recent policy reports or policy proposals. Students may also be afforded the opportunity to present at policy sessions at future UCEA conferences and co-author journal articles with members of the UCEA policy team. Invitation only. Facilitators: Janie Clark Lindle, Clemson University Ed Fuller, Pennsylvania State University Steve Gross, Temple University Participants: Paula Myrick Short, University of Houston Diana G Pounder, University of Utah Martha McCarthy, Loyola Marymount University Gary Crow, Indiana University


Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Columbus

4:20pm

Chicana/o and Latina/o Educational Leadership: Leadership Preparation and Practices in the Field
What is Latina/o educational leadership and how is it enacted to challenge the narrow parameters of what is considered educational leadership? Employing critical theories, pedagogies, and epistemologies and in conjunction with the convention theme, this symposium will offer insight into 1)Practices that promote equity, excellence and access in educational contexts; 2)Praxis that centers the cultural wealth of Latinas/os in schools; and 3) Innovations that inform Latina/o leadership.
Participants:
-Latina/o Educational Leadership: Testimonios from the Field Rebeca Burciaga, San José State University; GLORIA M RODRIGUEZ, University of California, Davis
- Prioritizing and Highlighting Approaches to Culturally Relevant Leadership and Pedagogies in Latino Community-Charter Schools Raul Lomelí, The Foundation for Hispanic Education; Dean Castillon, Luis Valdez Leadership Academy / Foundation for Hispanic Education; Patricia Reguerín, Escuela Popular
- Beyond Supervivencia: Leadership Pedagogies for Social Change and Chicano/Latino Education Patricia D. Lopez, San José State University
- Reconceptualizing Leadership in Migrant Communities: Latin@ Parent Leadership Retreats as Sites of Community Cultural Wealth Pedro Enrique Nava, Mills College; Argelia Lara, Mills College
 Facilitators: Gerardo R. Lopez, University of Utah Monica Byrne-Jimenez, Hofstra University


Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

4:20pm

Community-driven Activism & Leadership in a Neoliberal Era: Research on and with Detroit Educational Organizers
Papers in this symposium draw upon emerging findings from the first year of an in-depth, multiple case study that incorporates ethnographic and participatory action research methods to examine how a community-based, urban educational organization engages over 200 adult and youth organizers in activism to promote equity-oriented reform in Detroit’s highly contested, market-oriented educational arena. Data guides our understanding of organizers’ reform efforts in formal, informal, and even virtual spaces to challenge oppressive neoliberal educational contexts. Participants: “What Other Way Could I Have Gone?”: Parents Use Community Cultural Wealth to Lift Leadership from the Ground Up Kimberly Charis Ransom, University of Michigan Lifelines to Authenticity: The Role of Insider Narratives and Experience in Participatory Action Research and Community-Driven Leadership Dana G. Nickson, N/A; Dawn Wilson-Clark, N/A How Social Media Enables Education Activists in Detroit To Counter Deficit-Based Discourse: A Community Cultural Wealth Analysis Erika Reese, University of Michigan Facilitator: Camille M. Wilson, University of Michigan


Thursday November 17, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

5:40pm

General Session I: Opening General Session Featuring Keynote Tonya Allen
A serial “idea-preneur,” Allen serves as The Skillman Foundation’s president and chief executive of cer. Her career has centered on pursuing, executing and investing in ideas that improve her hometown of Detroit and reduce the plight of underserved people, especially children. Allen has been instrumental in many successful philanthropic, government, and community initiatives and has a comprehensive understanding of philanthropic governance and strategy. In her current role, Allen aligns the complexities of education reform, urban revitalization and public policy to improve the well-being of Detroit’s children. A special thank you to Texas A&M University for their sponsorship of this session.


Thursday November 17, 2016 5:40pm - 7:00pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Columbus

7:00pm

Convention Opening Reception in Honor of UCEA Past Presidents
Michelle D. Young, UCEA Executive Director and Monica Byrne-Jimenez, the Immediate Past President of UCEA, welcome all UCEA participants to the Convention Opening Reception and extend a special welcome to those faculty from new UCEA member institutions. The Convention Opening Reception was established in honor of the contributions made to the field and the UCEA consortium by UCEA's past presidents.

 
Friday, November 18
 

7:00am

Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) Member Meeting
Closed business meeting for faculty, students, and deans of CPED member institutions.

Session Participants

Friday November 18, 2016 7:00am - 7:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

The Call for Leadership: Why Department Chairs Serve, What They Do, How They Are Prepared, and How Long They Serve
The UCEA Center for the Study of Academic Leadership launched a national study investigating the roles, responsibilities, preparation, motivation, stress and other critical issues impacting department chairs. This session will showcase the results of this fall 2016 study and engage participants in drawing implications for the call to department leadership.


Friday November 18, 2016 7:00am - 7:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

8:00am

Applying Improvement Science to Advancing School-Family-Community Partnerships
Inequities within schools cannot be understood without considering the various out-of-school influences. School leaders must take a holistic approach to unpacking these inequities, seeing the developing child nested in a family that is in turn nested in a neighborhood. This critical conversation session brings together an array of scholars whose research and teaching addresses authentic school-family-community partnerships. Participants will engage in a focused discussion of how principles of improvement science can advance this work.


Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

8:00am

Developing a Design-based School Improvement Mindset in System-level Leaders: EdD Programs' Intersection With System Exigencies
This conversation brings together scholars who are incorporating design-based school improvement into EdD programs. The discussion will focus on the tension between a deliberate design-based approach and school systems’ orientation toward urgency and “proven” solutions. How can EdD programs engage with this tension such that students develop an approach that is effective, yet grounded in reality? How can EdD programs support alumni to employ this approach absent the robust community they inhabited as students?


Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

8:00am

Does the Past Have to be Prologue in Leader Development? A Critical Conversation
This year’s Call for Proposals explicitly solicited proposals that “challenge traditional conceptions of educational leadership and leadership development in complex settings.” Challenging traditional conceptions of leadership development—and, especially, articulating alternatives—is the focus of this session. This session builds on two previous AERA sessions focused on the history of the educational leadership/administration and especially the most recent session that focused on what is generally omitted from histories of the field.


Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

8:00am

The Reality of New Principal Leadership: Interconnecting Mentoring and Complex Contexts for Success
The purpose of the session is to stimulate meaningful dialogue around re-envisioning leadership development, mentoring, and interconnected opportunities for community-based professional learning in supporting new school principals as they enter and lead complex school environments. In this Critical Conversation, we invite session participants to consider and converse about key aspects in the process of leadership development: research-based best practice, mentoring, and local context. Reflective questions and real-person videos will inspire thinking and bridge scholarship experiences.

Session Participants

Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

8:00am

Critical Analyses of State and Federal Policy Initiatives
Participants:

A Paradox of High-Achievement: Implementing Race to the Top (RTTT) Policies in a High-Achieving School District. Dean L. Ramirez, University at Buffalo, SUNY

The threat-rigidity hypothesis suggests that when faced with a threat, organizations may
close down, reduce information ow, engage in poor decision making, and limit divergent views. This mixed-method study evaluated Trust, Leadership, and Threat-Rigidity facets in a historically high-achieving school district during a time of change. The results of this study suggest that administrators need to understand the culture and climate of a school district when implementing federal/state policies.

Another (Un)Funded Mandate: Lessons Learned From Race to the Top in a Phase 3 Winner State. Anjalé Welton, Yolanda Davis (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Race to the Top was designed with the assumption that grant “winners” would have the capacity to see their initiatives through. However, we question whether Phase 3 “winners” were actually “winners,” given they were faced with implementing the reform with much less nancial support to do so. Within this context, we focus on Illinois to understand how district leaders both made sense of and implemented the policy.

Colonizing/Decolonizing Policies in Native American Education: Rhetoric vs. Reality in ESSA Title VI. Michael R. Scott, University of Texas at Austin

This paper examines the Title VI provision of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which provides additional resources for Native American students, and its application within a school program. By applying the Deleuzian concept of assemblage as a postqualitative method, the policy and the related program operating within a neoliberal and neocolonial framework are interrogated. Promoting the decolonization of students, an engagement with the policy assemblage shows that its performance opposes its intent.

What Are We Really Guaranteeing: Ohio’s Third-Grade Reading Guarantee Quagmire. Andrew Saultz, Laurie Banks (Miami University)

This study analyzes Ohio’s Third Grade Reading Guarantee (TGRG) to evaluate how district of cials implemented the policy. We build off research that describes how administrators might respond to new demands: bridging and buffering. We use statewide reading test scores and administrative data from one medium-sized district. We find significant evidence that administrators in this district are buffering students and teachers from the TGRG.

The Politics of State Testing Policy: Understanding the Opt Out Movement Through Political Spectacle. Michael A. Szolowicz, University of Arizona

Some parents are refusing to allow their schoolchildren to take the standardized tests; they are “opting out.” This policy-centered case study examines the issues generated
in one state legislature from the Opt Out movement’s 2-year effort to change state standardized testing law. The study uses the theory of political spectacle as a framework for understanding how certain interests are represented in state policy formation and how leaders can influence state policy.



Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

8:00am

District and School Leadership for Special Education Inclusiveness
Participants:

An Analysis of the Discourses of Inclusion Within a District Leadership Team. Karen Ramlackhan, University of South Florida

The multiplicity of meanings of inclusion within special education have shaped the development and implementation of policies, procedures, and practices regarding inclusive education. This polarizing issue has created a rift among practitioners and researchers regarding where and how children with disabilities should be educated. This critically oriented discourse analysis explored how the discourses of inclusion are constructed, practices are normalized, and power relations are legitimized within a district leadership team via power/knowledge nexus and disciplinary power.

An Inclusive Leadership Model: Enhancement of Special Education Competency for Educational Leaders. Carlee Escue Simon, Amy Farley, Yvette Pennington (University of Cincinnati)

Administrators are critical in creating inclusive schools that are responsive to meeting the needs of diverse learners. Currently, however, there is a lack of emphasis about special education in the majority of leadership preparation programs. It is precisely this paucity in administrator preparation programs nationally that inspires our own strong commitment to develop an administrator preparation program that addresses this longstanding need.

The Extent to Which Leaders and Teachers Differ on Inclusiveness in Urban School Districts. Mario S. Torres, Wen Luo, Jean Madsen, Elisabeth Luevanos (Texas A&M University)

School districts are experiencing significant demographic shifts. As schools change, participants are being asked to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse group of students. A learning community of diverse school participants requires school leaders to respond to inevitable cultural con icts and face resistance in transforming organizational factors. This exploratory study examines similarities and differences between teachers and leaders in areas of school inclusion.

Were the Student’s Actions a Manifestation of His or Her Disability? Examples From Practice. Maria Lewis, Pennsylvania State University

Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), before a school district may discipline a student with a disability for greater than 10 days, decision makers must determine if the student’s behavior was caused by or had a direct and substantial relationship to the student’s disability. Relying upon the paperwork associated with such decisions, this paper will explore how decision makers implement this standard.




Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

8:00am

Exploring Ethical and Moral Leadership
Participants:

“You Have a Moral Obligation to Try”: Re-Envisioning Ethical Leadership in Complex Contexts. Patricia A. L. Ehrensal, College of New Jersey

The PBS Frontline program “Dropout Nation” followed the stories of 4 students and principal Gasparello, purportedly a “caring” and ethical principal. When 3 of the 4 students followed in the lm dropped out, he blames the students. Following from Foucault and Arendt, I conclude by unshackling themselves from prescribed measures of “student success” and addressing the needs of the students, principals can re-envision ethical leadership potential and place schools in a context of social justice.

An Aesthetic Examination of Ethical Decision Making Through Ethical Sensitivity, Moral Reasoning, and Moral Imagination. Patrick M. Jenlink, Stephen F. Austin State University

I examine, using educational poetics as a form of aesthetic inquiry, pedagogical
practices that incorporate a poetics of leadership activity. Poetics involves a deepening understanding and sensitivity to ethical reasoning and moral imagination and mirrors how events, actions, and the conduct of others can all express intellectual, aesthetic, and moral meaning. Poetics as an aesthetic mirror is examined in developing moral literacy and ethical frames of leadership. Four years of research data are reported.

Revitalizing Educational Organizations—Applying Ethical Leadership Praxis in Schools and Higher Educational Institutions. Penny Lee Tenuto, Mary Elisabeth Gardiner (University of Idaho, Boise)

The purpose of this integrative literature review was to draw together recognized streams of knowledge to inform contemporary educational leadership in democratic societies.
The Ethical Leadership Praxis in a Global Society model includes four synergistic and interactive dimensions. The paper makes an original contribution for building leadership praxis centered on ethical leadership. The model applies theory and encourages leaders to self-re ect on their own values, practices of leadership, and how their actions can create inclusivity.

Servant Leadership and Cultural and Moral Differences. Duane Covrig, Andrews University; Appiah Kwarteng

This interactive paper presentation examines empirical, cultural and moral ndings from the servant leadership practices of 1,248 religious leaders in Ghana and the U.S. Variations on Love, Empowerment, Vision, and Humility and cultural dimensions of Power Distance, Gender Egalitarianism, and In-Group Collectivism used in GLOBE leadership studies will be discussed. Researchers will guide the audience discussion of their moral concerns about cultural variation in servant leadership models.

School Leaders’ Experiences of Ethical Dilemmas. Tim Guy, Virginia Tech


This paper describes a study that used a hermeneutic phenomenological approach as described by Max Van Manen (1990) to explore experiences where issues of ethics are conspicuous, namely, in experiences school leaders had with ethical dilemmas. The study explored the question: How do school leaders experience ethical dilemmas in their role as school leaders? Understanding this experience will contribute to our understanding of ethics in the role of school leadership.




Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

8:00am

Facilitating Student Learning in Science, Math, and Technology
Participants:

Predicting Science Leadership Behaviors for the NGSS: The Influence of Principals’ Background, Context, and Self-Ef cacy. Kathleen Winn, UCEA/University of Virginia

Thousands of elementary principals in the U.S. are working to implement the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) as part of their science education policy agenda. This study uses self-reported survey data from elementary principals (N = 667) serving in 13 NGSS states to analyze how principals’ backgrounds, contexts, and levels of self-ef cacy help predict principals’ engagement of instructional leadership behaviors in science.

Instructional Leadership for K-8 Science: Measuring Leadership Content Knowledge for Science Practices (LCK-SP). Rebecca Lowenhaupt, Boston College; Rebecca Katsh-Singer, Brandeis University; Katherine McNeill, Boston College; Kyle Fagan, Boston College

Despite the important role principals play as instructional leaders, there remains much to learn about the knowledge principals use to supervise instruction, particularly across subject areas. This paper focuses on K-8 science reform. We have explored the leadership content knowledge (LCK) principals need to develop in order to help teachers adapt their practice. We present the design process for an instrument to measure LCK, findings from a pilot, and implications for leadership training and practice.

“Why” Before “How”: Framing Technology Reform in Houston Independent School District. David Casalaspi, Michigan State University

This study applies collective action framing theory to the problem of 1:1 technology implementation in Houston Independent School District (HISD). Drawing on document sources and interviews with district elites, it describes how issue framing and policy messaging helped secure implementation success. HISD crafted resonant issue frames that effectively justi ed 1:1 and mobilized educators and stakeholders to embrace it. Sources of frame resonance included frame consistency and exibility, experiential commensurability, and credible leadership.

The School Leaders’ Role in Students’ Mathematics Achievement Through the Lens of Complexity Theory. Emma Bullock, Utah State University

This explanatory sequential mixed methods study, utilizing both survey (N = 250) and focus group (N = 24) data from K-12 principals in a midwestern state, serves to inform current school leaders, and future research, on aspects of school leadership through the lens of complexity theory, including the use of the School Leadership in a Complex Adaptive System (SL-CAS) Framework to understand the role school leaders play in students’ mathematics achievement.



Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

8:00am

Leading Teaching and Learning Under the New Common Core Standards
Participants:

Leading to Higher Standards: A Leadership “Common Core” for Meeting the Common Core. Brad Cawn, Jill Grossman, Gina Ikemoto (New Leaders)

This presentation highlights ndings from the Leading to Higher Standards project, a comparative case study of rising urban schools who have shown signi cant growth in college- and career-readiness levels. Focal areas include the knowledge and skills needed by principals to meet the demands of more rigorous standards and assessments, the role of culture in enabling improvements to the instructional core, and the challenges of creating sustainable systems to improve teaching and learning schoolwide.

Leadership Behaviors and Teachers’ Self-Reported Preparedness for and Use of Common Core Aligned Math Practices. Angela Rossbach, Morgaen Donaldson, Shaun Dougherty (University of Connecticut)

The Common Core has swept the nation, necessitating changes to curriculum and instruction on a broader scale than ever before. How are teachers receiving such changes, and are teachers’ perceptions and implementation of Common Core aligned practices related to their principals’ leadership? This paper answers these questions based on a survey of over 2,000 K-8 math teachers in Connecticut.

Common Core in Action: Organizational Expectation, Teacher Beliefs, and Motivation. Yi- Hwa Liou, National Taipei University of Education; Alan J. Daly, University of California, San Diego

This study addresses the importance work of teachers around implementing the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and speci cally investigates the relationships between teachers’ CCSS actions as well as organizational and individual factors that in uence those actions using structural equation modeling. The data come from all the teachers in one school district serving a diverse student population. Findings suggest direct effects of organizational expectations and intrinsic factors on teachers’ CCSS actions.

Organizing for Instruction: An Analysis of the Organizations Sponsoring State Standards Resources. Emily Hodge, Montclair State University; Serena Jean Salloum, Ball State University; Susanna Benko, Ball State University

This paper describes the organizations sponsoring state-provided standards resources for secondary English language arts from all 50 states. We coded these 318 organizations by type of organization, level of governance, and for-pro t versus nonpro t status. We also ranked organizations according to how many states linked to each organization. Findings indicate that while states are linking to a wide variety of organizations, the most influential organizations are nonprofit, national-level policy and membership organizations.




Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

8:00am

Restorative Practices and Youth Activism
Participants:

Re-Visioning School Discipline: Restorative Justice and the Unlabeled Labor of Black Administrators. Hilary Lustick, Texas State University

School discipline is a growing concern within the larger conversation of racial equity in education. Restorative practices are generally lauded as a positive alternative to suspension,
and it is presumed that they can assuage racially disproportionate outcomes. Yet they have been documented to replicate the same racial inequalities as suspension. Using school-level data from a yearlong multicase ethnography, the current study examines the underlying mechanisms by which restorative practice can replicate inequality.

Re-Envisioning Discipline in Complex Contexts: An Appreciative Inquiry of One District’s Implementation of Restorative Practices. Elizabeth Fowler, Goochland County Public Schools; Stacey Rainbolt, Goochland County Public Schools; Katherine Cumings Mansfield, Virginia Commonwealth University

The purpose of this paper is to share one phase of a multiphased, community-based research endeavor examining the development, implementation, and outcomes associated with the shift from a punitive model of discipline to that which emphasizes social justice, community, and relationships.

Restorative Educational Practice: Reforming the Factory Model No More. Lisa A. W. Kensler, Auburn University; Cynthia L. Uline, San Diego State University

The theme for our 2016 UCEA Convention calls on us to “bring new life and meaning to the role of education and educational leadership.” This paper challenges our fundamental conceptions regarding educational systems and calls for a dramatic shift from the factory model to a living systems model of schooling and school improvement. Green schools and whole school sustainability provide a practical pathway, already well underway.

Youth Led Dialogues on Social Justice: A Counternarrative of Youth as Change Agents. Jason Deric Salisbury, Daniel D. Spikes (Iowa State University)

This qualitative research presents a counternarrative of traditional leadership by highlighting the work of youth in creating a Teen Summit on Social Justice with the goal of shifting school and community actions around racism and social justice. Findings highlight heightened levels of self-ef cacy in students, the importance of teacher leaders in relinquishing programmatic control to youth, and increased empowerment experienced by youth around engaging peers, teachers, and school leaders in conversations around school-based injustices.




Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

8:00am

Appreciative Inquiry as an Approach to Leadership Preparation Program Improvement
Appreciative Inquiry is a strengths-based approach to action research and strategic planning that has been used in organizations large and small around the globe. In this session participants will learn more about appreciative inquiry (AI) and its use in educational organizations. Particular emphasis will be given to the use of AI in the preparation and professional development of educational leaders.


Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

8:00am

Demystifying the Academic Job Search, Part I: Tips and Resources for Those Considering the Professoriate
Are you interested in being a faculty member? Do you wish you had better insights into how the academic job search process works? Do you want practical tips and resources to help you be a better candidate? This session is for you! Please check out the UCEA Job Search Handbook before you arrive: http://www.ucea.org/opportunities/ucea-job-search-handbook/ (and other resources for the academic job search in the UCEA Opportunities section: http://www.ucea.org/ucea-opportunities/)

Session Participants
avatar for Erin Anderson

Erin Anderson

Assistant Professor, University of Denver


Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

8:00am

The Implications of ESSA for Educational Leadership Preparation & Practice
In this session participants will discuss the implications of the new ESSA legislation for the preparation and practice of educational leaders. Unlike previous iterations of ESEA, the roles, responsibilities and development of educational leaders are given explicit attention in ESSA. How states implement the new legislation, however, will significantly impact, if not determine, the opportunity to develop and support high quality leadership through ESSA.


Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

8:00am

Turnover in Schools: New Measures, New Contexts
One of the most persistent challenges in high-poverty schools is the retention of teachers and principals. Our panel brings together four papers that address a range of issues related to turnover in schools in different organizational settings (traditional public and charter schools), contexts (city, state, national), and different actors (principals, teachers). We bring together a diverse range of theoretical perspectives, methodologies, and contexts to understand the nature and impact of turnover in schools.
Participants:
- A New Look at Teacher Turnover: Understanding the Geography of Instability in Schools Jennifer J. Holme, University of Texas - Austin; Huriya Jabbar, University of Texas - Austin; Emily Germain, University of Texas - Austin; Wesley Edwards, University of Texas - Austin; Joanna D Sanchez, University of Texas - Austin
- The Influence of Typologies of School Leaders on Teacher Retention: A Multilevel Latent Class Analysis Angela Urick, University of Oklahoma
- Will They Stay or Will They Go? Understanding the Career Decisions of Charter School Principals Chris Torres, Montclair State University
- How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement. Matt Ronfeldt, University of Michigan


Friday November 18, 2016 8:00am - 9:10am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

9:20am

Town Hall: Harnessing the Potential of Educational Leadership under ESSA
The shifting educational landscape under The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has presented new opportunities and challenges for the educational leadership field.  The 2016 Town Hall will explore the new policy emphasis on educational leadership and highlight practical strategies for translating this emphasis into substantive and positive impacts at the state level. As states develop education improvement plans to meet ESSA requirements, it is critical that educational leadership is featured prominently. Participants will describe forward-thinking strategies states are using to promote educational leadership under ESSA, critical areas of research, and new doors these strategies are opening for leadership development and practice. A special thank you to The Wallace Foundation for their sponsorship of this session.


Friday November 18, 2016 9:20am - 10:50am
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Columbus

11:00am

Black Mask-ulinity: An Emerging Framework for Black Masculine Caring in Educational Leadership
This session proposes a discussion that examine the notion of caring among Black men. Black men and their caring is examined from the perspectives of scholars who have expertise in the area Black masculinity. Their combined work illustrates the stories of Black men who care, and serves to construct the initial tenants of the Black Masculine Caring (BMC) framework. The critical discussions generated in this session will further extend the BMC framework.


Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

11:00am

Complex Contexts for Leadership
Participants:

Demanding Inclusivity: A Galvanizing Exploration of Strategies to Cultivate Inclusive Schools. Rana T. Razzaque, University of Denver

This Ignite will engage the audience in a provocative journey exploring oppression experienced by disenfranchised students and re-envisioning leadership, praxis, and systemic approaches to creating safe and inclusive spaces for diverse students. The visual experience is complemented with spoken word and a call to action, which not only galvanizes leaders from all facets of the education arena to embrace greater urgency in this work, but also provides actionable strategies to cultivate inclusive schools and organizations.

Sick Education Systems Mirror Sick Societies: The In uence of Poverty on Urban School Improvement. Erin Anderson, University of Denver

This longitudinal case study explores the unique contextual factors to be considered when planning for improvement. The high concentration of students with extreme academic needs, coupled with a high proportion of students struggling with the social realities of their community, hindered change. While these problems are outside of the control of school-level leaders, these realities need to be recognized and incorporated into planning for school improvement, whether at the federal, state, district, or school level.

Constructing a Leader’s Social Justice Conscience: An Elusive Goal. John W. Somers, Lynn Wheeler (University of Indianapolis)

The formula for preparing school principals who strive for social justice remains elusive. Evidence shows that many principals lack the perspective needed to ensure high-quality outcomes for all students, especially underserved populations—students with disabilities, English language learners, and children living in poverty. A principal preparation program at a liberal arts university has created experiences to disrupt candidates’ current belief system about social justice and instill values of equity and opportunity in their aspiring leaders.

Educational Leadership Through Pedagogies of Social Transformation: Innovations From Urban Life in Latin America. Michael P. O’Malley, Tanya Alyson Long, Diana Barrera, Susan M. Croteau, Jeffry King, Brett Lee (Texas State University)

This Ignite presentation reports on a research project exploring pedagogies of social transformation across schools and community organizations in the complex urban environment of Santiago de Chile. It offers insight into distributed forms of educational leadership within and beyond schools that elicit imagination and practices oriented toward social transformation. Possibilities are presented for partnerships among justice workers in urban communities. The presentation format highlights evocative representations of ndings through concurrent visual, narrative, and vocal/musical expressions.




Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

11:00am

Strategies for Determining Appropriate Impact Measures for Leadership Preparation Programs: The Evaluation Matrix Tool
New Leaders’ evaluation team has designed an interactive “Evaluation Matrix” through which we collaborate with stakeholders to identify appropriate outcome measures based on each program’s unique design, objective, and theory of change. This session will be an interactive work group, where participants will break into small groups with a facilitator who will guide participants’ use of the tool, and engage the group critical conversations about the appropriateness different outcome measures for each program.


Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

11:00am

Role-Alike Session for Sitting and Aspiring Deans
Today’s colleges and schools of education are facing increasing demands and challenges. Reduced state funding, increasing emphasis on enrollment management, and political pressures related to the quality and relevance of education preparation programs are influencing the priorities and responsibilities in our colleges and schools. While navigating these challenges, we must also simultaneously attend to the development of leadership capacity within our colleges, enhancing the quality, relevance and sustainability of our academic portfolios, develop and nurture mutually beneficial partnerships across the campus and externally, manage accountability and accreditation requirements, deal with student and personnel issues, raise funds through development work, support faculty in their pursuit of external funding opportunities, promote positive public relations and engage in pro-active marketing, and many of us must operate our colleges using new budget models and dwindling resources. Phew! This session is an opportunity for us to learn from each other, commiserate, identify issues of common interest, and continue an ongoing dialogue about how leadership in higher education should and could be engaging with the political, economic, and market influences we are facing. This session is open to all sitting deans, assistant and associate deans, and those aspiring to become deans.


Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

11:00am

Educational Leadership and Policy Targeting Student Learning and Success
Participants:

Direct Versus Indirect Relationship Between Principal Leadership and Student Learning: Considering the Source of Information. Jimmy Sebastian, University of Missouri; Haigen Huang, Miami University; Matthew Phillip Cunningham, University of Missouri

In this paper we compare the relationship of instructional leadership with student achievement via mediating organizational when we switch the source of information
on leadership from teacher surveys to principals’ own ratings. With teacher surveys, instructional leadership is indirectly related to achievement via school climate; with principals’ own ratings, the relationship is direct. We discuss implications for direct versus indirect nature of principals’ work in schools and the importance of data source in in uencing ndings.

How Principals Bridge to and Shape Instructional Reforms in Crowded Policy Contexts. John Lane, Michigan State University

This paper answers questions about how the principal at three middle schools built support for voluntary reforms and how they shaped mandatory reforms. It also examines differences among principals’ backgrounds, priorities, and knowledge that help account for their different responses to reform. Finally, it provides evidence that the principals at the three schools played a signi cant role in determining what both mandatory and voluntary reforms became and the opportunities teachers had to learn about them.

Collaborating Across Boundaries: Educational Service Agency Use of Collaboration in Supporting Instructional Reform. Julie R. Freeman, University of Michigan

Drawing on comparative case study methodology, this study explores how three educational service agencies used collaboration as they supported their constituent districts in implementing the Common Core State Standards, an example of ambitious instructional reform. My ndings suggest there are varying, yet overlapping, ways for these agencies to successfully leverage collaboration to support district and school reform, including providing resources, being the center for “common work,” and developing relationships.




Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

11:00am

Emerging Trends in Educational Leadership Scholarship - A Montage
Participants:

Examining the Construct Validity of Principal Time Use Studies. Abby S. Mahone, Craig Hochbein, Sara Catharine Vanderbeck (Lehigh University)

Over the past 100 years, studies have reliably shown that principals spend the largest percentage of their time on administrative activities. From a distance, these data may indicate consistency across time; however, closer inspection reveals major discrepancies in time-use constructs that question the researchers’ ability to compare data across studies. If principal time-use data are not generalizable or comparable across studies, our understanding of how principals spend their time is deeply limited.

Practivist Scholars Bridging the Theory and Practice Divide. A. Minor Baker, Isaac Abram Torres, Richard Pelton, Jason Swisher, Sarah Nelson Baray (Texas State University)

Educational leaders seeking doctoral degrees are often divided into two camps, practitioner and scholar. This study provides a reaction to traditional educator leadership programs, which often assume an EdD is a practitioner degree and a PhD is a theoretical degree, by investigating the ways doctoral programs can effectively bridge the gap between student as scholar and student as practitioner in the development of scholar- practitioners through dialogue, support, and collaboration.

The Panorama of Theoretical Groundings of Educational Leadership Research 2005–2014: A Theory Co-Occurrence Network Analysis. Yinying Wang, Georgia State University

This study aims to investigate the theoretical groundings of educational leadership by analyzing the network in which the nodes represent all 301 theories that framed 1,328 articles in EAQ, JEA, JSL, and EMAL from 2005 to 2014, and the ties linking the co- occurring theories. The results of network analysis suggest four themes of theories closely interact with one another, but the increasingly pluralistic theoretical foundation did not yield the conceptual cohesion in educational leadership research.

Scholarship, Social Justice, and the EdD: A Tryptich for Progress. Elizabeth C. Reilly, Franca Dell’Olio (Loyola Marymount University)

This study examined how faculty-student scholarship can address social justice and how the EdD degree can address the challenge and goal. It explored faculty beliefs about how joint scholarship can foster an agenda of social justice and their perceptions of the access and barriers to establishing a scholarly relationship. Interviews revealed what promotes and inhibits their work during and beyond the dissertation. Included are recommendations for leadership programs whose goal is promoting social justice.

A Systematic Review of Principal Time Use Research. Sara Catharine Vanderbeck, Abby S. Mahone, Craig Hochbein (Lehigh University)

Since the early 1900s, researchers, policy makers, and educators have been interested
in how principals spend their time. In 1920, McClure found that elementary principals spent 43% of their day on administration. A century later, Grissom, Loeb, and Mitani (2015) observed similar results. This literature review attempts to bring depth and subtlety to the discussion surrounding principals’ impact on school improvement and student achievement by identifying and reviewing research focused on principal time allocation.




Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

11:00am

Leading in Rural Communities
Participants:

Principals’ Early Career Experiences in Rural Schools: Transitional Challenges They Face. Douglas M. Wieczorek, Iowa State University; Carolyn Manard, Boone Community School District

The purpose of this study is to identify the challenges facing novice, rural principals as they strive to perform a role demanding a breadth of management and leadership responsibilities. In this study we addressed the following research questions: 1. What types of obstacles do novice rural principals face as they transition into a the role of a building principal? 2. What areas of leadership development and mentoring should superintendents focus on when working with novice rural principals?

Exploring the Influence of Context on the Leadership Capacities of Rural Public School Principals. Ian Christopher Kinkley, Michigan State University

This study examines how experience, preparation, and context interact to in uence the instructional leadership capacity of rural school principals. Interviews with two Illinois principals explore how they perceive themselves within their contexts; the challenges and successes as instructional leaders; the expectations of the district, community, and state; and how they are held accountable. Findings suggest these principals prefer rural settings and feel their abilities are well suited for the contexts in which they operate.

Fostering Regional Learning Improvement Coherence: A Study of Educational Service Agencies and Successful Rural Schools. Wesley Henry, University of Washington

This paper explores the structures that promote coherence for learning improvement efforts between rural schools, districts and educational service agencies (ESAs) and, regionally, across districts within an ESA. Structural and service links between sustainably improving rural schools/districts across three ESAs were investigated, and ndings highlight the ability of ESA administrators to leverage economies of scale and marshal broad improvement initiatives. Additionally, the challenges of remoteness are explored in the context of ongoing improvement efforts.

Connecting Learning and Leading for Principals in Small Districts and Rural Areas. Glady Van Harpen, Cardinal Stritch University

The study examined and described the phenomenon of how secondary school leaders in
small school districts and rural areas connect to information and knowledge in order to further their professional learning. The study explored how and to what extent technology, informal communities of practice, and personal learning networks have in uenced professional learning in small school districts, which are geographically isolated from large urban centers and institutions of higher education.




Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

11:00am

Leveraging Development through Inquiry and PLC Models
Participants:

Understanding the Link between Professional Learning Communities and Teacher Collective Efficacy. Robert Holland Voelkel, Jr., University of North Texas

This quantitative study investigated the relationship between PLCs and teachers’ collective efficacy drawing on 297 surveys from 16 schools in one district that had systematically implemented PLCs. Our findings showed that higher functioning PLCs predict higher levels of teacher collective ef cacy. This suggests that engaging and supporting teachers in PLC work, as this district did, can lead to enhanced collective ef cacy, which in turn can contribute to improved student achievement.

Building Teachers’ Knowledge of Student Engagement in a High-Needs Context: Leadership for Collaborative Teacher Inquiry. Kristy Cooper, Michigan State University

This mixed-methods embedded case study examines collaborative teacher inquiry in one diverse, low-income high school working to enhance teachers’ knowledge and practice around student engagement. The study seeks to understand whether and how this system of collaborative inquiry supports the development of teachers’ knowledge about engagement and their use of engaging practices. To assess how this happens, the study examines how intra- and inter-group processes, including administrator and teacher leadership, shape school-wide organizational learning.

Teacher Collaborative Action Research: The Complexity of Professional Development in Rural Environments. Katherine Curry, Shawna Richardson, Edward L. Harris, Jackie Mania-Singer (Oklahoma State University)

This qualitative case study utilized distributed leadership theory and Capobianco and Feldman’s (2006) conceptualization of conditions for collaborative action research (CAR) to describe a district leader’s implementation of CAR as professional development and school improvement strategy in a rural Midwest district. Findings indicate that distributed leadership facilitates CAR as a powerful professional development tool and results in development of action plans for school improvement; however, conditions are necessary for CAR to affect professional practice.

Clinical Scholarship: Powerful Principal Professional Learning Communities. Teena Paige McDonald, Washington State University

This paper and session will review research of the use of a principal professional learning community (PPLC) by four new elementary principals in Washington State and give results of the yearlong study. Using the theoretical lenses of trust and the 21 Responsibilities of School Leaders, I will share ndings from PPLC transcripts, shadowing principals, and interviews and give implications of the PPLC, which was developed by a cohort team of graduates from the Washington State University principal preparation program.

The Coaching of Aspiring Principals: Using and Shaping Learning Processes for Standards- Aligned Leadership Competency Development. Shelby A. Cosner, Lisa Walker, Jason Swanson, Martha M. Hebert (University of Illinois at Chicago)

We report fi ndings from a longitudinal study of two cohorts of aspiring principals during a preparation experience and examine the following: 1. What learning processes were shaped, utilized, or motivated by leadership coaches in their work to promote the standards-aligned competency development of aspiring principals? 2. What are the key features of these learning processes, and what relationships exist between these learning processes within the context of leadership coaching for aspiring principal competency development?




Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

11:00am

Systems-Level Capacity and Reform
Participants:

Complex and Diverse Cultural Contexts and Organizational Capacity System Impacts on Student Performance. Thomas Alsbury, Seattle Paci c University; Adam Swinyard, Spokane Public Schools

This study explores how complex and diverse school culture can in uence effective implementation of reform efforts aiming to improve student learning. The study found a signi cant relationship between improvements in reading and math pro ciency rates in middle schools and the school’s use of an organizational monitoring system. Framed around organizational learning theory, ndings indicate that the use of organizational monitoring systems are linked to improved student learning.

Developing System-Level Capacity to Support Local Instructional Reform. Jean Mrachko, University of Michigan

In the context of a large-scale school improvement initiative, my aim is to understand
the speci ed vision for the role of network-based implementation consultants and to observe the mechanisms involved in translating this vision into enacted practice. Through the investigation of these operations, I investigate the development of new knowledge to guide innovative forms of leadership practice and the work of replicating and activating that knowledge among leaders across the system.

Preparing Leaders to Actualize Systems Reform. Lok-Sze Wong, University of Michigan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the changes to leadership practice needed in order to construct and lead complex, coordinated instructional systems, and the learning opportunities that would build this capacity. Building on studies of coordinated systems in the organizational learning literature, I examine whether the concepts of shared understandings, shared work, and heedful interrelating are applicable to constructing unique instructional systems. Local leadership may be charged with developing these capacities in others.

Unintentionally Fragmenting Instruction: Administrators’ Unintentional Sensegiving and Systems Reform Outcomes. Lok-Sze Wong, University of Michigan

While the new NELP standards call for leaders to be prepared to champion systems reforms, little is known about the knowledge and skills required. This paper examines what knowledge is lacking but needed in administrators’ practice to lead the construction and management of coordinated instructional systems. Building on the concept of sensegiving from organizational studies, which examines how leaders shape others’ sensemaking, I study administrators’ sensegiving in their efforts to actualize a systems reform.

An Organizational Capacity Framework: Supporting Educational Reform in Complex Contexts. Kathryn N. Hayes, Christine Bae-Lee (California State University, East Bay)

Attaining educational reform goals in complex urban contexts is dependent on building organizational capacity. Lacking, however, is a framework that adequately conceptualizes those resources, or capitals, that contribute to organizational capacity. Based on a systematic review of the literature, this paper presents an organizational capacity framework that integrates relevant capitals using a social ecological model—forming a foundation for research establishing which capitals leaders can target to facilitate reforms in complex urban contexts.



Session Participants
avatar for Lu Young

Lu Young

Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Kentucky
Retired from P12 education in KY after 31 1/2 years; 9 years as superintendent of Jessamine County Schools. Currently serving as Director of Next Generation Educational Partnerships, teaching principal preparation, and working with the Next Generation Leadership Academy. Areas of interest: superintendent prep, principal prep, leading for deeper learning


Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

11:00am

Teachers' Perceptions on Educational Policy
Participants:

Teacher-based Analyses of the Title I SIG Program: Impacts of Time, Timing, and Policy Intentions. Tuesda Roberts, University of Pittsburgh

The study represents an interjection of teachers as knowledgeable policy analysts whose direct experiences with the entire span of a policy’s implementation and professional expertise position them to meaningfully contribute to sustainable school reform efforts. The findings speak to the multiple and crucial roles of teachers and highlight the need to meaningfully incorporate teachers who have demonstrated a long-term commitment and excellence into decision-making processes about the t, consequences, and ideological consequences of educational policies.

Urban Teachers as Educational Policy Analysts: Shedding Light on the Complexities of School Reform. Tuesda Roberts, University of Pittsburgh

The teachers’ descriptions of misaligned goals and actions, their sympathetic yet critical analyses of school and district leadership, and their description of how the Title I SIG policy impacted their professional ef cacy presented a multifaceted view of how the policy implementation practices relate to teacher practices and to the revitalization of underperforming schools. This study’s teacher-based analyses “refresh” approaches to school reform leadership by (re)positioning teachers as integral and informed agents in a school’s trajectory.

Legitimizing the Dilettante: Teach for America and the Allure of Ed Cred. Davis Clement, College of William and Mary

The purpose of this study was to describe the initial urge to apply to Teach for America and the implications for conceptions of educational leadership and policy being developed by young, ambitious TFA alums. The phenomenon proposed, ed cred, is a unique conception of legitimacy blending the competitive hero teacher narrative with three new experiential variations: the drive for credibility, the preference for convenience, and the need for a credential.

Teacher Perceptions of Whole School Sustainability Practices in U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools. Tania Lynn McKey, Lisa A. W. Kensler (Auburn University)

This study’s purpose was to extend the emerging literature related to U.S. Department
of Education Green Ribbon Schools by gathering teacher perceptions related to green school practices in these schools. This award represents a national strategy for promoting responsible environmental stewardship, school building occupant well-being, and education for sustainability across U.S. schools, public and private. Findings provide evidence that these schools are trailblazers for the 21st century, leading the way towards whole school sustainability.




Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

11:00am

Understanding and Supporting the Journeys of Black Female Academics
Participants:

Beyond the Pipeline: A Community of Practice Approach to Faculty Diversity. Atiya Strothers, Rutgers University

Recently, there have been student protests at major institutions rallying for inclusion and equity. A primary demand is increasing faculty diversity. This paper addresses the experience of Black faculty at HWIs through the lens of Wenger’s (1998) communities of practice. By reframing this question using this framework, I present a new paradigm on ways to re-envision educational leadership.

De-Essentializing Women of Color: A Tri-Autoethnographical Analysis of a Social Justice Educational Leadership Doctoral Program. Shahlaine Kaur Dhillon, Tara Nkrumah, Ericka Roland (University of South Florida)

The purpose of this study is to examine how three women of color doctoral students navigate an educational leadership program with a social justice orientation. Using a rhetorical reworking of feminist standpoint theory, the lived experiences of three women of color, provided via authoethnography, are recorded and analyzed for how the social justice is being internalized.

Lived Experiences of Black Women Doctoral Students in Education Programs at Predominately White Institutions. Jessica Faith Carter, Audrey Sorrells, Barbara L. Pazey, North Cooc (University of Texas at Austin)

Research has shown that Black women in doctoral programs are more likely to experience challenges in pursuit of their education due to the intersectionality of their race and gender. This qualitative study explores the lived experiences of Black women in education doctoral programs at a predominately White institution. Findings from the study will be presented, and implications for universities and K-12 school systems will be shared.

The Perceptions and Experiences of Black, Female Students at a Predominantly White Institution (PWI). Hattie Lee Hammonds, Clemson University; Cherese Fine, Clemson University; Corliss Brown Thompson, Northeastern University

The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions and experiences of Black female undergraduate students at a PWI. The study explored how the campus climate had changed in light of recent local and national racially charged events. Findings revealed that participants had varied perspectives in how they experienced, coped with, and understood racism. These experiences impacted how they viewed the campus and navigating through college as a Black woman at a PWI.




Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

11:00am

Building Networks of Support: You’re Not in This Alone
Whether you are a full-time graduate student or a managing both work and graduate study, networks of support are crucial to scholarly development and personal health. Networks of support can come in different forms and from different places, including within departments and beyond campuses, with peers, more established scholars, and those not in academia. Panelists will discuss the various networks they fostered at different stages of their graduate programs and beyond.


Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

11:00am

Standards for School Leadership Preparation
Members of the National Educational Leadership Preparation (NELP) Standards committee will share and discuss the new preparation standards with UCEA participants. Presenters will overview the development of the standards, their alignment with other national standards, key issues with regard to their use within the CAEP Advanced program review process, and the timeline for their implementation.


Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

11:00am

Leadership for Justice or Just Leadership? Reimagining School Leadership amid Community Disinvestment, Gentrification, and Corporate Reform
In an era of widening inequality, competition, and high-stakes accountability, both the study and practice of education leadership have yielded largely to what Cuban (1988) characterized as the “managerial imperative” of leadership in schools. This symposium examines, from multiple perspectives, how school leaders navigate, mediate, and negotiate the realities of community disinvestment, gentrification, and corporate reform in an era of severe educational inequality and injustice.
Participants:
- Stuck Getting Ready: Exploring the Emotional Underpinnings of a Racial-Equity School Improvement Project Decoteau J. Irby, University of Illinois at Chicago
- “The Souls of Our Children are at Stake”: A Principal Takes a Stand Rosa Rivera-McCutchen, Lehman College CUNY
- Leaping from Criticality: Self-Determination and Educational Leadership Muhammad Khalifa, University of Minnesota; Gevonee Ford, Network for the Development of Children of African Descent (NDCAD)
- How Schools and School Leaders Mediate Urban Gentrification Chy Benelli McGhee, New York University; Gary L. Anderson, New York University
- Decolonizing Latin@ Leadership in a Chican@ City? How a Just Political and Humane Framework Can Serve Brown Students, Families and Communities. Enrique Aleman, Jr. University of Texas at San Antonio


Friday November 18, 2016 11:00am - 12:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

12:20pm

Clinical Scholarship: A Conversation on Navigating the Structures of the Clinical Line
As the roles of clinical faculty continue to develop, the notion of clinical researchers is also evolving. This critical conversation is the first step in a research project on the work of clinical faculty in educational leadership at UCEA member institutions. Three clinical faculty members will lead the session seeking to answer, “How can clinical researchers in educational leadership add to the body of research with work that is grounded in practice?”


Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

12:20pm

North Carolina's Bathroom Bill: Considering Law, Theory, and Practice
North Carolina's House Bill 2, passed in the 2016 legislation session, has set off a firestorm in school districts across the county. A few provisions in particular have significance for practicing school administrators. HB 2 requires school districts to enact regulations on single-sex, multiple-occupancy bathrooms and changing facilities. Specifically, it requires that transgendered students use bathrooms that match the sex identified on their birth certificates. During this critical conversation invited guests and attendees will consider the implications of the bill for law, theory, and educational leadership practice.


Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

12:20pm

Reimagining Educational Leadership for Social Justice
Distinguished scholars discuss the current state of educational leadership and its trajectory towards adequately addressing issues of social justice. The focus surrounds the pursuit of social justice as a phenomenon that is under-realized, though widely referenced by researchers (O’Malley & Capper, 2015). The diversity of these scholars’ work provides multiple perspectives. Each shares how this field can be reimagined via interrogating the pursuit of social justice in policy and leadership preparation programs.


Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

12:20pm

Charter Schools: Can They be of Use?
Participants:

Are Cyber Students Enrolling in the Best Cyber Charter? How Metrics of Performance Predict Choices. Bryan A. Mann, Pennsylvania State University; Stephen Kotok, University of Texas at El Paso

This study examines school choice patterns within the cyber charter school sector. Studying choice in this domain, which has fewer geographic constraints than typical “markets,” offers a unique opportunity to explore theoretical assumptions about school choice and clarify choice patterns, important to school leaders as they consider strategies to respond to new schooling options. We find that choices perpetuate disadvantage because advantaged populations are more likely to choose the highest performing cyber charter school.

Leadership Knowledge and Practices in the Context of Charter Schools. Marytza Gawlik, Florida State University

To date, very little research on leadership has focused on charter schools. Even though charter schools continue to grow in number and importance within the U.S. public education system, leadership in charter schools remains somewhat of a “black box.” In this paper, I address these gaps in the literature by (a) documenting and analyzing leadership knowledge and practices among charter school principals and (b) focusing on principals’ own reports of their leadership practices.

Competing With Charter Schools: How Traditional Principals Re-Envision and React. Dana L. Bickmore, University of Nevada-Las Vegas

Using qualitative case study methodology, I examined how three principals reacted, responded, and re-envisioned their leadership as a charter school opened in their attendance area. Educational free market principles framed this study. Three themes surfaced from a modified constant comparative approach to data analysis: initial stress, actions taken, and perceptions of competition. Findings suggest principals personal stress increased, they made organizational changes, and their attitudes about competing with the charter changed over time.

Access to Charter Schools in Ohio: Serving or Undeserving the Needy. Christopher Bwalya Yaluma, Ohio State University; Andrew Saultz, Miami University

This paper investigates the true nature of charter schools as a viable alternative to
low income families. Using census tracts data, students’ achievement scores, and demographics data, we apply a form of inductive reasoning to hypothesize general factors leading to locational preferences of charter schools in Ohio. Results suggest that charter schools in Ohio are somewhat responsive to poverty, but poverty is not the central factor in locational decision making.




Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

12:20pm

Culturally Relevant Leadership and Discipline Practices
Participants:

Culturally Relevant Leadership and Deaf Students of Color: Socially Just Lessons for School Leaders. Catherine A. O’Brien, Gallaudet University; Judy Alston, Ashland University; Andrea Sonnier, Gallaudet University

The purpose of the study was to document the relationship between students of color, Deaf culture, culturally relevant pedagogy, identity development, and leadership practices in schools for the Deaf. The research questions focused on how culturally relevant pedagogy and leadership emerged in schools for the Deaf, how students of color identi ed with both their birth culture and Deaf culture, and how students of color navigated schooling and multiple identities.

Culturally Responsive School Discipline: Lessons From the Field. Hilary Lustick, Texas State University

Scholars of school climate generally concur that school discipline practices can negatively or positively impact the climate of the school. However, school discipline reformers at
the federal and district levels are currently preoccupied with reducing suspension rates in schools. Drawing on ethnographic data from three different public schools in New York, this paper evidences that successful restorative practice implementation requires heavy work on relationship and community building. The paper concludes with school and district level recommendations.

Making Sense of Racial Discipline Disparities in a Diversifying Suburban High School. Decoteau J. Irby, University of Illinois at Chicago

This qualitative study of a school discipline improvement effort in a large diversifying suburban high school used sense-making theory to examine how teachers’ repeated exposure and engagement with new types of discipline and climate data shaped their collective ways of understanding root causes of racial disparities in discipline.

Daughters of Discipline: Girls’ and Their Mothers’ Views on the School Climate. Zorka Karanxha, Vonzell Agosto, Heather McConnell, LaTeesa Allen (University of South Florida)

This article reports on a qualitative study of girls of color and their mothers’ perceptions of discipline in the climate of secondary schools. The students’ differential experiences across micro-climates (in classrooms with teachers, on buses, and in school clubs) illuminate the discontinuity of their discipline experience as they move from class to class. This study adds to the literature on race, gender, and school discipline and climate.




Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

12:20pm

Doctoral Education in Educational Leadership
Participants:

Signature Design Features for the Scholarly-Practitioner’s EdD: Lessons and Outcomes in Refreshing Practice. Jim Allen, James W. Koschoreck, Cindy J. Reed (Northern Kentucky University)

The purpose of this session is to discuss the development, implementation, and recent efforts in refreshing practice within a CPED member EdD program in educational leadership. In addition to discussing the contextual factors that have led to continued program change, we will detail six signature design features and discuss how this innovative program ts within the context of recent and emerging changes in professional doctoral education.

Mentoring as Preparation for the Professoriate: Insights From Jay D. Scribner Mentoring Award Recipients. Joel R. Malin, Miami University; Donald G. Hackmann, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign; Shaobing Li, Miami University

This qualitative study involved interviews of each of 11 professors who have received the
UCEA Jay D. Scribner Mentoring Award. Participants described the instrumental, psychosocial, and relational supports they provided to their protégés, while noting the uniqueness of each relationship; described bene ts they and protégés experienced; and described the importance of lifelong relationships. Acknowledging numerous mentoring opportunities provided by UCEA and AERA, participants provided recommendations on how programs could be enhanced.

Building Doctoral Programs to Prepare Culturally Competent Educational Leaders. James Coaxum, Rowan University, JoAnn Manning, Rowan University, Beverly Johnson-Green, Logan Township School District; Debora Rivera, Union County College; Ajeenah Nuriddin, Rutgers University; Silvana Zircher, Hamilton Township School District; Mary Clark, Carteret Community College

This research study investigates how a doctoral leadership preparation program develops culturally competent leaders. Utilizing a mixed methods research design, this study examines the program’s pillars that foster knowledge, skills and disposition around cultural competency. These include multicultural/intercultural education, leadership for social justice, culturally relevant pedagogy, and global education.

The Consequential Relationship Between Doctoral Course Design and Capstone Design. Valerie Anne Storey, University of Central Florida

This mixed methods research study considers how doctoral programs are designed, the different types of courses available, and the relationship between program design and capstone in the UK and USA. We will explore the variety of ways in which professional doctorate programs prepare candidates for their research study by drawing on data obtained from a survey of 150 higher education institutions and qualitative data from 12 interviews with program coordinators.




Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

12:20pm

Leading Schools in Complex Settings
Participants:

Leadership for Learning—A Multifaceted Task in a Complex Setting. Katarina Norberg, Helene Karin Ärlestig (Umeå University, Sweden)

The case study describes one principal’s leadership in terms of implementing change in
a context influenced by a sociocultural history, and what occurs when the conflicting interests are challenged. The school’s culture and history have an impact on school improvement efforts and the principal’s individual skills and motivation. To create changes in the classroom, a systemic change is essential, despite conflicting interests and resistance.

School Principals as Mediating Agents in the Complex Context of Education Reforms. Haim Shaked, Chen Schechter (Bar-Ilan University)

School principals may be seen as mediating agents, standing between the extra- and intra-school worlds. This study explores how principals mediate between the demands
of a national reform policy and teachers’ attitudes and needs. In this qualitative study, 59 Israeli school principals were interviewed. Findings indicated that principals used two complementary mediation strategies: (a) mobilizing the teachers towards the reform and (b) mobilizing the reform towards the teachers. Practical implications and further research are discussed.

School Leaders’ Changing Work in Complex Settings During the 10-Year Education Reform. Annie Yan-Ni Cheng, Hong Kong Institute of Education; Elson Szeto, Education University of Hong Kong

This study examines changing nature of school leaders’ work during education reform in complex settings. We adopted a case study of investigating how two Hong Kong principals’ work was changed in responding to the 10-year education reform and demographic changes. Multiple qualitative data were collected. The results show that the principals’ scope of work had been changing and expanding to identify new opportunities for school development. Implications for school improvement and effectiveness are discussed.

Thinking About Complex Contexts in Ways That Might Make a Difference. Karen R. Seashore, University of Minnesota

Larger and more complex districts often do not function effectively to support principals and teachers in improvement. This paper focuses on the importance of context and leader behaviors as factors that affect the ability of schools and districts to become more effective. In particular, does leadership that matters vary (a) between schools depending on the types of students who attend, (b) by the size and location of the district, and (c) between more and less complex school organizations?



Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

12:20pm

Promise of Community Schools
Participants:

A Qualitative Study of a Resettled Muslim Community’s School Relations. Michael Hess, Charles L. Lowery, Rowda Olad, Connor Fewell, Steven Yeager, Tracy Kondrit (Ohio University)

This study examines the perceptions of Somali parents of schools in a Midwest urban area about parent involvement and school responsiveness. This research adds to the literature on immigrant and refugee school-community relations and parent involvement. As well, it discusses perspectives of immigrant parents of school children about being informed and involved in urban schools.

Integration, not Gentrification: Participatory Action Research in an Urban PTA. Courtney Wait, Texas Christian University

This study explores the relationship of a new PTA to a historically low-income public school in a gentrifying neighborhood. The PTA was formed by a group of White middle- class parents who did not re ect the broader school population. Utilizing participatory action research, preliminary ndings demonstrate that there are not shortcuts to integrating a diverse urban school: communities need to work to welcome all parents, build relationships across cultural barriers, and recruit more diverse leadership.


Studying the Implementation of the Federal Full-Service Community Schools Grant Program. Jennifer Jellison Holme, Andrene Castro, Michael C. Barnes, Madeline Laurinda Haynes (University of Texas at Austin)

This paper examines the creation and early implementation of the Full Service Community Schools Grant program. The data for the paper include the federal Requests for Proposals (RFPs), the 32 funded FSCS applications, as well as targeted interviews with both federal of cials and advocates involved in the program at the federal level. Our research offers important implications for policy makers and educational leaders working with community partners.

“No One Told Me How to Do it”: Leading for Partnerships in a Community School. Anne Marie FitzGerald, Sandra Quiñones (Duquesne University)

In this yearlong, qualitative case study, we asked: What is the role of a community school principal in fostering authentic partnerships that facilitate family preferred forms of engagement? Successive analysis of semistructured interviews with partners (12) and the principal (3) surfaced four interrelated leadership practices: building relational trust, fostering democratic dialogue and disagreement, negotiating reciprocity, and nurturing expanded notions of desirable student outcomes. Authentic partnerships require time, trust, intellectual humility, and courage to be vulnerable.



Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

12:20pm

School Boards- Purposes and Perspectives
Participants:

Documenting the Relationship Between School Boards and School Board Monitors and its Effect on the Community. Joshua Childs, University of Texas at Austin

Using interview data collected from two districts in the northeastern and one in the southwestern United States, this qualitative case study is an attempt to detail the relationship that exists between the local school board and the state-mandated monitor that has been placed in the district for management and oversight purposes.

School Boards as Springboards? The Future Political Careers of Local School Board Members. Jason A. Grissom, Lam Pham, David Woo (Vanderbilt University)

Although previous research has found evidence that the type of political ambition elected of cials possess in uences their decision to run for higher office, political ambition of school board members has largely gone unstudied. Our study lls this gap in the research by examining how political ambition in uences board members’ behaviors. Our fi ndings provide some evidence that school boards are not analogous to other political offices in terms of offering a channel to higher political office.

Superintendents, School Boards, or Outsiders: Re-Envisioning the Role of District Leaders in Enacting Policy Reform. Samantha E. Holquist, University of Minnesota

I propose an analysis to understand (a) how radical education policy reform occurs at the district level and (b) the role of district education leadership in making this reform. I analyze case study ndings to ascertain the factors that in uenced a radical policy reform’s formation and adoption. Findings increase our comprehension of how these reforms occur in district politics. Additionally, they challenge our understanding of the role of district leadership in advancing these reforms.

“We’re Good! Leave Us Alone!” School Board Sense-Making of Accountability Reporting. Daniella Hall, Northwestern University

Federal policy implementation is ultimately in the hands of local educational leaders, who adapt reforms based on their personal interpretations. This qualitative study examines how school board members interpret external messaging regarding NCLB accountability reporting, and how their sense-making shapes their use of reporting on the local level. The study finds board members’ interpretations of the purpose of testing only partially aligned with state messaging and was highly influenced by local needs and community context.




Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

12:20pm

Graduate Students of Color Mentoring Session
This session is designed to give students from underrepresented groups the opportunity to dialogue with scholars from different institutions. Panelists will interact on issues related to doctoral study and completion, research and publication, mentoring and socialization, as well as succeeding as faculty members.


Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

12:20pm

Thinking Forward to the Higher Education Act
In anticipation of the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act and federal and state policy work around ESSA, UCEA administered two surveys to gain a sense of emergent challenges and opportunities. The first focused on critical issues facing the field of educational leadership and the second attempted to gain a sense of the networks of influence operating in and around UCEA’s membership. In addition to presenting and discussing the findings of these two surveys and an overview of Higher Ed Act forecasts, presenters will overview a draft action plan for the educational leadership professoriate.

Session Participants

Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

12:20pm

Writing in Graduate School: A Workshop to Expand Your Toolbox
Roundtable, participatory and collaborative efforts where YOU bring your course papers, conference papers, or unfinished manuscripts to get them one step closer to completion and submission for publication. This is a time to shake off our writing nerves and anxieties to feel more competent academic writers. Join us and get ready to do some work!

Session Participants

Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

12:20pm

Embracing the Rising Tide of Data Analytics in Educational Leadership and Policy
This symposium aims to introduce the applications of data analytics in educational leadership and policy research. With the rising tide of big data, this symposium explore how to apply the emerging data analytics to leverage the high-volume, high-variety, and high-velocity data in school leadership preparation, principals’ use of a data warehouse, and educational policy. This symposium invites scholars to capitalize on the potential of data analytics where big data, educational leadership, and educational policy converge.
Participants:

Leaders on the Job Market: An Analysis of Application Patterns & Preferences. Peter
Trabert Goff, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Alex J. Bowers, Teachers College, Columbia University


How Technology, Strategic Decision Making, and School Context In uence Principals’ Use of a Data Warehouse: A Latent Class Growth Analysis. Tim Drake, North Carolina State University


Education Policy Research and Big Data: Applying Quantitative Text Analysis Techniques. John Wachen, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Text Mining Social Media Data on the Common Core State Standards: Topic Modeling
and Hashtag Co-Concurrence Network Analysis. Yinying Wang, David Fikis (Georgia State University)




Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

12:20pm

Extraordinary Women in Educational Leadership: Voices of Latina, African American, and Pakistan Female Leaders
This symposium combines five studies that give voice to the personal experiences of aspiring Latina principals, African American female principals, Mexican and African American female superintendents in the United States and the challenges of female educational managers in Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Pakistan. The presentation will highlight the need for educational leadership programs to consider the various forms of capital that women of color bring to educational institutions.


Friday November 18, 2016 12:20pm - 1:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

1:40pm

General Session III: Mitstifer Lecture feat. Dr. Geoffrey Canada
In his 25-plus years with the Harlem Children’s Zone (HCZ), Geoffrey Canada has become recognized internationally for his pioneering work helping children and families in Harlem and as a passionate advocate for education reform. Geoffrey Canada will discuss the Harlem Children’s Zone Model and the organization’s holistic approach. In order to improve educational options for children, we need a collective impact, and large scale change. Geoff will discuss the importance of aligning with thought partners and stakeholders invested in rebuilding communities and working together to effect change and achieve the best outcomes for children. Among the strategies for success that ultimately help develop the whole child include cultivating a love of learning and community building. All of these efforts “collectively impact” educational opportunities for youth and economic development and stability for communities. A special thank you to Pennsylvania State University and The Brock International Prize in Education Foundation for their sponsorship of this session.

Session Participants

Friday November 18, 2016 1:40pm - 2:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Columbus

3:00pm

Continuing the Cross-Institutional Conversation about the Program Coordinator Role: Piloting a Survey
At the 2015 UCEA conference, a critical conversation was begun about the role of the program coordinator, its challenges, strategies for overcoming those challenges, and best practices across programs. One suggestion from participants in that session was to conduct a survey across preparation institutions to gather data about these roles, challenges, strategies, and best practices. The purpose of this session is to continue that conversation and to frame it by piloting an online survey.


Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

3:00pm

Clinical Scholarship: The Story of STEAM: Clinical Collaborative Leadership for Transformational Change
Session describes the development of STEAM Academy, a clinical partnership high school. In its 4th year, STEAM has engaged in structural transformations to the high school model, which will be shared, through a direct focus on a collaborative transformational leadership approach.

Session Participants
avatar for Lu Young

Lu Young

Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Kentucky
Retired from P12 education in KY after 31 1/2 years; 9 years as superintendent of Jessamine County Schools. Currently serving as Director of Next Generation Educational Partnerships, teaching principal preparation, and working with the Next Generation Leadership Academy. Areas of interest: superintendent prep, principal prep, leading for deeper learning


Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

3:00pm

Escaping the School to Prison Pipeline: Creating Safe School Environments
Participants:

A School-to-Prison Pipeline or a System at Work? A Synthesis of Literature. Andrea Kalvesmaki, Irene H. Yoon (University of Utah)

The “school-to-prison pipeline” (STPP) is of increasing concern in education. Most analyses of STPP address school zero-tolerance policies as the central contributing factor. However, school policy does not operate in isolation. This literature review synthesizes 31 texts addressing and identifying policies from education, juvenile justice, and federal law. Using systems theory, the 29 policies identfied across the texts are grouped and discussed in terms of their confluence, feedback effects, and networked contribution to the STPP.

Neoliberalism’s Effect on School Violence Policies and Racial Disadvantage. Ryan Kapa, Ohio State University

Using neoliberalism as a theoretical framework, this paper examines how school violence policies implemented within school systems contribute to racial disadvantage. Under neoliberal influence, school security has grown increasingly privatized. School violence policies are discussed in detail within the paper. These greater rates have led to minorities failing to receive the same type of education that White peers receive. Administrators must become aware of the effect of neoliberalism and its influence over school violence policies.

Successful Escape from the School to Prison Pipeline: Re-Envisioning Leadership Practices That Champion Justice. Dionne Cowan, Janice Fournillier (Georgia State University)

The school to prison pipeline (STPP) is a conceptual framework re ecting the injustice that bleeds at the intersection of the educational and criminal justice systems. This phenomenological study examined the lived experiences of six men of color and their successful evasion. Constructionism and critical inquiry framed this phenomenological study. The findings pinpoint the role structures of support that champion justice, success, and equity for boys and young men of color played in the process.

Takin’ it to the Streets: Leading Organizational Citizenship, Curbing Bullying, and Ensuring Safe Campus Communities. Page A. Smith, University of Texas at San Antonio; Sean Kearney, Texas A&M University-San Antonio

Developing leader strategies for dealing with campus violence is critical. This investigation targets one aspect of deleterious school behavior, student bullying, and analyzes how leader initiated organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) at the faculty level rede nes safe learning spaces in the campus community. The general hypothesis, that OCB is positively related to teacher protection of students, is supported, and multiple regression analyses provide a more re ned picture of leadership and the school safety issue.




Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

3:00pm

Leadership Preparation and Outcomes
Participants:

Leadership Preparation Program Matters: Examining the Relationships Between Program Attributes and Graduate Learning Outcomes. Yongmei Ni, Diana G. Pounder (University of Utah)

With the Graduate Survey data of the INSPIRE surveys, this study utilizes structural equation modeling to assess the relationships among educational leadership preparation program quality variables and graduates’ learning outcomes, as reported by program graduates from multiple principal preparation programs. Our results show that faculty quality, program rigor and relevance, peer relationship, and internship are all significantly associated with various graduates’ learning outcomes.

Analysis of the Relative Effectiveness of Principals From Selected Preparation Programs in Four Urban Districts. Matthew Clifford, Eric Larsen (American Institutes for Research)

Principal preparation programs increasingly are asked to show strong postgraduation outcomes, such as student learning. This George W. Bush Institute study, which American Institutes for Research executed, uses comparative interrupted time series to estimate impact of placing new principals trained by four, innovative, urban preparation programs on student reading/English language arts and mathematics test scores. The study found differences in student performance in schools led by inexperienced principals that cannot be explained by participation in the selected preparation programs.

Principal Preparation Programs and Principal Outcomes. Jason A. Grissom, Hajime Mitani, David Woo (Vanderbilt University)

Despite concerns about variation in the quality of university-based principal preparation programs (PPPs), little research has assessed the degree to which outcomes for PPP graduates in fact vary systematically by program. Using data from Tennessee, we link approximately a decade’s worth of PPP graduates to their schools, licensure examination scores, and multiple measures of job performance. Our results have implications for how states use principal outcomes for accountability and evaluation of PPPs.

The Principal Pipeline: Mismatches in Leadership Preparation Purposes and Employment Outcomes. William Black, University of South Florida; Arnold Danzig, San Jose State/Arizona State University

This research examines the distribution of initial building-level administrative licensure across institutions of higher education in three state contexts (California, Indiana, Minnesota). The research across multiple state provides a snapshot of initial career paths of individuals prepared by university preparation programs, other institutional providers, as well as other entry routes into the principal pathway. This research and analysis can guide further state, regional, and program-level inquiry.

Understanding the Research About Principal Preparation Programs: A Systematic Literature Review. Jeremy B. Landa, University of Connecticut

This systematic literature review is an evaluation of the reporting on principal preparation programs. I attempted to determine whether reporting uses a dominant framework, the types of stakeholders who participate in the studies, and the quality of the instruments used to collect data. Findings include a majority of articles being oriented towards scientific management, the majority of participants in the study being practicing principals, and unreported analysis of reliability and validity of instruments used.



Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

3:00pm

Promise of Urban School Reform
Participants:

Leadership and Student Outcomes: Evidence From Teacher Perceptions in Urban Restructured Schools. Angela Lynn Newcomb, Blake Haselton, Marco Muñoz (University of Louisville)

This quantitative study examined the relationship between teacher perceptions of teacher and school leadership and student achievement in urban restructuring schools in Kentucky. Multiple regression analysis and MANOVA were used to determine the impact of perceptions of leadership on student outcomes. Discussion will focus on the impact of restructuring efforts used in Kentucky and potential leverage points for school and district leaders. Implications for practice in Priority Schools will be discussed.

Making Sense of the Emerging Role of “Specialty Schools” in Urban Settings. Jeff Walls, Sara Kemper (University of Minnesota)

Public specialty schools in urban settings differ from traditional schools and serve students who have been unsuccessful in traditional school settings. Our research investigates how teachers at specialty schools, in a range of contexts, de ne student success and interpret the ways in which external policy factors in uence their practice. We find several fissures between schools and district policies, and our research implies room for more focus on the process of quality and equity in education.

For Justice or for Profit? Examining Enduring Tensions in Urban School Reform. Craig Peck, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Analyzing major scholarly works and historical and contemporary events, I consider several enduring tensions that have characterized urban school reform since the 1960s. For instance, policies created by distant, delocalized experts have routinely engendered unanticipated local effects and erce community resistance. In addition, particular school reforms have served simultaneously as means for encouraging social justice for urban students of color and as mechanisms for generating revenue for educational vendors. I close by examining implications.

Re-Envisioning Culturally Competent School Leadership in an Urban School District: A Case Study. Gaëtane Jean-Marie, University of Northern Iowa; Bradley W. Carpenter, University of Houston; Tia Dumas, University of Louisville; Daniel D. Spikes, Iowa State University; Lisa Hooper, University of Louisville; Amanda Bowers, University of Louisville

As one component of a larger longitudinal research project, this study probes school leaders’ understanding of cultural competence as a mechanism to develop an equity responsive climate (ERC) able to enhance teaching and learning, while also increasing the shared understanding of the practices necessary to meet the needs of diverse student learners. ERC, a latent construct, is a triadic process premised on the affective, cognitive, and behavioral domains of cultural competence




Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

3:00pm

Research on the Evaluation of Teachers
Participants:

Examining Relationships Between School Evaluation Conditions and Evaluation Scores. Amanda Marie Slaten Frasier, Michigan State University

Despite recent state legislation mandating high-stakes teacher evaluation, there is little research on what, if any, affect evaluation has teacher practice in the classroom. I will draw on literature about motivation, teacher use of feedback, teacher responses to external accountability pressure, and teacher responses to curriculum reform to develop a framework for future studies. I will also present preliminary results from pilot research utilizing this framework to examine the relationship between evaluation and classroom practice.

How Principals in High-Pressure Environments Navigate Teacher Evaluation Policy Implementation. David B. Reid, Michigan State University

This explanatory multicase study follows ve school principals in high-pressure, complex settings who are negotiating changing teacher evaluation policies in Michigan, while trying to recruit and retain the best teachers for their students.

Principals’ Perceptions and Enactment of Tasks Related to Recent Changes to Teacher Evaluation. Tiffany Wright, Millersville University; Suzanne McCotter, Montclair State University

Teacher evaluation reform has focused on the ways teachers make a difference in terms of student learning. As main implementers of these reforms, principals’ work lives have been impacted. This study surveyed and interviewed principals in Race to the Top states. Participants identi ed the ways in which their work lives have changed, shared the bene ts and detriments of new legislation, and made recommendations for improvement.

What is the Impact of Formative Teacher Evaluation Experiences on U.S. Teachers’ Satisfaction? Timothy G. Ford, Angela Urick, Alison Shelby Page Wilson (University of Oklahoma)

Research is quite clear about approaches to teacher appraisal/evaluation that build teachers’ intrinsic motivation for improvement. By applying a quasi-experimental framework to data on U.S. teachers’ experiences from the 2013 TALIS survey, we endeavored to answer the following question: What is the impact of meaningful, fair, and largely formative teacher evaluation experiences on U.S. teachers’ satisfaction? Propensity score analysis revealed a robust positive effect of formative teacher evaluation experiences on U.S. teachers’ satisfaction.



Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

3:00pm

Supporting Early Career Teachers
Participants:

Clinical Scholarship: Using Surveys to Understand Implementation of Field Experiences in Missouri Educator Preparation Programs. Stephen Meyer, REL Central/RMC Research; Emma Espel, RMC Research

The Regional Educational Laboratory for the Central States (REL Central) at Marzano Research administered a survey to examine eld experiences in Missouri educator preparation programs. The presentation will include information about the study, “Understanding Field Experiences in Traditional Teacher Preparation Programs in Missouri,” how it was implemented in collaboration with stakeholders, and how ndings were shared to support program improvement. Presenters will facilitate discussion about how similar research may be applied in leader preparation programs.

Is Alternative Certification the Answer? Examining Beginning Teacher Turnover by Route to Certi cation. Ed Fuller, Pennsylvania State University; Liz Hollingworth, University of Iowa; Brian An, University of Iowa

ESSA provides incentives for states to create or expand alternative certi cation programs (ACPs) for teachers. One issue with such a policy is how it might affect the teaching profession and student achievement. Using beginning teachers cohorts from 2005–2010, this study examines beginning teacher attrition from the initial school and teaching overall. We nd ACP teachers—especially those from private ACPs—are more likely to leave their schools and the teaching profession.

Leadership in Urban Teacher Preparation Programs: An Analysis of Interest, Experience, and Recent Graduate Impact. Kate Rollert, Michigan State University

Responding to recent concerns of the supply and quality of teachers in underresourced, urban schools, this study examines an institutionally based urban teacher preparation program. Through semistructured interviews and observational data, I critically examine the mission of the program and its potential for preparing future teachers. I also examine the likelihood for teachers to choose urban preparation programs over traditional models, stay in urban classrooms, and find value in their professions.

A Case Study of Informal Mentoring: Interactional Patterns. Fengning Du, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages; Qi Wang, University of San Francisco

Through the prism of the Dynamic Process Model of Mentoring, this presentation seeks to describe the in uencing factors and interactional patterns of informal mentoring from the perspectives of new teachers. Social interaction is found to be a critical in uencing factor. Although spontaneous and immediate, informal mentoring is found to be limited in impact. Finally, this presentation raises a number of theoretical and practical implications for researchers and practitioners.

An Analysis of Teachers’ Career Paths in Arizona: Retention, Mobility, and Attrition. Jeanne Powers, Margarita Pivovarova (Arizona State University)

Teacher retention is as a pressing problem for Arizona’s public schools. Teacher retention rates are substantially lower than the national average. We analyze retrospective employment data for ve cohorts of teachers employed in Arizona between 2010-11 and 2015-16. We examine the association between ve constructs within the retention domain and contextual and labor market factors such as school and district characteristics. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for school leaders and policymakers.



Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

3:00pm

Digging In: How to Read and Digest the Research
Graduate students are expected to read widely as they eventually move toward narrowing down their own research. This session will address how to read vast amounts research strategically, how to focus your reading, how to situate readings into broader contexts, and how to apply a critical lens to readings.


Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

3:00pm

Presidential Session on Special Issues
This session will provide a forum for sharing concerns about recent and/or local issues that impact leadership preparation, school leadership, and faculty development. In adition, discussion will include opportunitites to brainstorm how UCEA can strngthen its leadership in the field. The session will be facilitated by the immediate Past President. 

Session Participants

Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

3:00pm

A Study Visit of An Exemplary Educational Leadership Preparation Program: The Urban School Leaders Collaborative
In preparation for a study visit sponsored by the University Council for Educational Administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio, the purpose of this symposium is to provide a succinct overview of the Exemplary Educational Leadership Preparation Program known as the Urban School Leaders Collaborative (USLC). In this symposium, the audience will have the opportunity to learn about and engage in an interactive reflection about the unique features of the USLC.


Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

3:00pm

How Do We Know What We Know? Reconsidering Research Methods in Educational Leadership
This symposium brings together a collection of “state of the field” articles focused on different aspects of research in educational leadership and considers their potential to make an even greater contribution to the field’s understanding of leadership, equity and excellence. Papers in this symposium examine different approaches to educational leadership research—including qualitative, quantitative, historical, mixed method and policy analysis studies.
Participants:

Qualitative Research and Educational Leadership: Classic and Cutting-Edge. Jeffrey S. Brooks, Monash University; Anthony H. Normore, California State University, Dominguez Hills


Considering Critical Turns in Research on Educational Leadership and Policy. Sarah Diem, University of Missouri; Michelle D. Young, UCEA/University of Virginia


Explicating Metatheory for Mixed Methods Research in Educational Leadership: An Application of Habermas’s Theory of Communicative Action. Rodney S. Whiteman, Indiana University


The Past as More Than Prologue: A Call for Historical Research Purpose. Diana D’Amico, George Mason University; Sonya Douglass Horsford, Teachers College, Columbia University




Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

3:00pm

Living for Community: Cultivating Leadership for School and Community Change
The purpose of this session is to highlight the transformative work in an educational leadership program in Central Texas as we expand the meaning of education and community leadership. This session will inform and invite participants to engage in conversation about the possibilities of creating dynamic learning experiences for emerging school leaders through a hybrid model that borrow theory and practice from community development and Community Learning Exchange pedagogies.

Participant: Living for Community: Cultivating Leadership for School and Community Change Miguel Angel Guajardo, Texas State University; Samuel Garcia, Texas State University; Eulogia V. Martinez, Texas State University; Sara Torres, San Marcos CISD; monica valadez, Texas State University
The purpose of this session is to highlight the transformative work in an educational leadership program in Central Texas as we expand the meaning of education and community leadership. This session will inform and invite participants to engage in conversation about the possibilities of creating dynamic learning experiences for emerging school leaders through a hybrid model that borrow theory and practice from community development and Community Learning Exchange pedagogies. This work is grounded in the practice of community partnerships, strong instructional leadership, cultural competence and community engagement as it informs a culturally sustainable and praxis oriented framework.


Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

3:00pm

Privatization and school choice within international educational institutions
Through privatization efforts, the traditional landscape of public education is changing globally. Private services within the public schools target test development and preparation, data analysis, targeted remedial instruction, and charter school development (Koyama, 2013). Expanding such services and increasing school choice drives neoliberal marketization across educational institutions (Powers, 2009). As such, this panel will discuss how neoliberal discourses have gained power over educational policy and decision making at the international, national, state, and local levels.
Participants:

Resisting and Persisting Inequity Through School Fees and Fundraising in Ontario, Canada. Sue Winton, Michelle Milani (York University)


Reforming Choice Reform: Moving Beyond Market Approaches to Educational Justice. Kevin Lawrence Henry, Jr., University of Arizona


The Contemporary Transformative Educational Framework: Leading With the School Community in the Southwest United States. Linsay DeMartino, University of Arizona




Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

3:00pm

Promoting Equity, Inclusion, and Transformation by Redesigning Research and Revitalizing Research Methods
Many typical designs and methods employed in the educational administration field marginalize rather than empower already marginalized groups. This session’s purpose is to explore research methodologies and research designs inspired by (a) the African American experience, (b) queer theory, (c) the experience of being deaf, (d) indigenous cultures, and e) transformative perspectives that re-imagine research in ways that offer fresh insight into how to revitalize education in complex and challenging contexts such as Detroit.
Participants:

African Americans Researching African Americans. Annivory Calvert, Wayne State University Indigenous Methodology: A Critical Methodological Analysis. Hollie Mackey, University of Oklahoma


Indigenous Methodology to the Rescue: How Ideas and Processes from a Cree Talking Circle Improved an Aristotle-Inspired Approach to Program Evaluation. Robert Donmoyer, University of San Diego


Deaf People and Deaf Culture Methodology. Catherine A. O’Brien, Gallaudet University
Social Media as a Methodology. Thomas A. Zook, Wayne State University
Transformative Methodologies. Jasmine Ulmer, Carolyn M. Shields (Wayne State University)




Friday November 18, 2016 3:00pm - 4:10pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

4:20pm

A Critical Conversation about Marginalization and Oppression in Complex Urban Environments
This session will engage participants in a critical conversation that goes beyond decrying the failure of urban schools and school systems to successfully educate all students. We will seek to understand and begin to redress some of the root causes of the failure. Although education is often blamed for many of the problems of our wider society, it requires broader-based understandings and coalitions if we are to redress the current situation of “failing urban schools.”



Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet A

4:20pm

Creating a Collaborative Agenda: Meaningful Research on 21st Century Superintendent & District Leadership
Despite significant findings on the critical role, responsibilities, and system impact of the K12 school’s executive leader, a commitment to research on Superintendent and District Leadership continues to be an area that has been neglected over time. This session provides a focused space in which to engage in discussion of a meaningful agenda for research on Superintendent and District Leadership. A collaborative agenda for future scholarship and research will be developed explored, and implemented.


Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

4:20pm

The Practice of Social Equity in Schools: A Critical Conversation
This Critical Conversations/Dialogue will be ignited by practicing and aspiring school administrators from one school district and professors in a preparation program for educational leaders for social justice. The intent of this dialogue is to stimulate a national conversation in a participatory format about existing barriers in school systems.


Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

4:20pm

College Readiness and Student Access
Participants:

Has the Texas Top 10% Plan Really Created Equal Access to its Premier Public Universities? Lolita Tabron, University of Denver

This study is an investigation of the effects of the University of Texas (UT) admission cap on a school’s odds of being a Texas Flagship feeder school. Findings indicate the UT admission cap reduced the number of high schools that sent students to Texas A&M and UT. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to show which K-12 school characteristics predict a school’s odds of being a feeder before and after the UT cap.

College-Going Culture Messaging: Considerations for 21st Century Schools and Their Leaders. Melissa Ann Martinez, Katherine Lewis, Isaac Abram Torres (Texas State University)

Through a symbolic framework, this case study critically examined the messaging associated with the college-going culture at three racially and economically diverse Texas high schools. The research questions included (a) what types of college-going culture messages are conveyed at the schools, and how; and (b) how do students, school staff, and leaders perceive such messaging and its impact? Findings revealed both explicit and implicit visual and verbal college-going messaging that were interpreted differently by multiple stakeholders.

Leading for Social Change: Developing College and Career Guidance Systems for Students That Engage Communities. Tricia L. Johnson, University of Denver

As American youth consider future career options, they need to be part of learning environments that engage them as active participants, respect the value they bring, and empower them to innovate through utilization of applied 21st century skills, which includes an examination of the processes with which American education exposes students to and prepares students for careers. A purposeful approach to career exploration is essential for students to make well-informed, productive decisions about career opportunities.

Implications of College Readiness Policies on Students, Teachers, and School Leaders. Melissa Ann Martinez, Jocabed G. Marquez, Yvette Cantu, Patricia Rocha (Texas State University)

A focus on improving college readiness nationwide has resulted in increased state college- readiness policies. Yet limited research examines how schools are implementing and
being impacted by such policies. Drawing on a critical sociocultural framework, this study examined how state and local college-readiness policies are impacting students, teachers, and school leaders at three Texas high schools. Findings shed light on how college- readiness policies are being appropriated and impacting stakeholders in different ways.




Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

4:20pm

Locus of Control: State or Local?
Participants:

District-Based Reform or State Takeover: Reassessing the Impact on Black Student Achievement. Steven Nelson, University of Memphis

This paper evaluates the impact of state takeover of public schools in New Orleans on Black student achievement, aside from achievement on state-based test scores. The paper finds that Black student achievement lags in the Recovery School District when assessing various non-test-score based indicators of student achievement. The paper concludes by assessing the various possibilities for assuring enhanced academic achievement for Black students.

Reform, Revitalization, or Ruse? A Comprehensive Look at the Literature on State Takeover of Schools. Nicola A. Alexander, Samantha E. Holquist (University of Minnesota)

Preliminary findings suggest that state takeover has limited impact on student outcomes. The nature of state takeover matters more for revitalization of leadership than student performance. Removal of the elected school board is likely to be more conflict ridden than simply removing district administrators. If local communities initiated the state takeover, there is less conflict and increased potential for positive partnerships between the state and district management personnel, resulting in a more meaningful revitalization of leadership.

Return to Local Control: The Policy Context of Charter Schools and Community Agency in New Orleans. Emily Germain, University of Texas at Austin

Much of the research on charter schools investigates how market mechanisms function, with little research exploring the impact on community, and particularly community agency. Through content and discourse analysis, this study examines the policy context surrounding Louisiana’s SB 432, which returns all of the state-run charter schools to local control, and seeks to decipher whether the bill was sold, intended, and perceived as a mechanism to increase democratic participation among the New Orleans community.

The Influence of State Education Governance Arrangements on the Education Policymaking Process. Rachel White, Michigan State University

This research examines the implications of recent shifts in state education governance arrangements and the implications they have for those interested in in uencing the education policymaking process. Namely, I explore the ways state education governance arrangements influence (a) the education policymaking process, (b) policy responsiveness, and (c) policy outcomes.



Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

4:20pm

Principal and Teacher Relationships
Participants:

Does Physical Proximity in School Buildings Predict Teachers’ and School Leaders’ Advice- Seeking About Instruction? James Spillane, Matthew Shirrell (Northwestern University)

This study examines the relationship between physical proximity and instructional advice seeking among school staff. Using two distinct measures of physical proximity, and social network methods that control for a variety of factors known to predict work related ties, we nd that school staff are signi cantly more likely to form ties with those they are physically closer to in their school buildings. We discuss implications for policy and practice related to school leadership.

Early Career Teacher Fit and Attrition in Hard-to-Fill Versus Easy-to-Fill Teaching Positions. Frank Perrone, UCEA/University of Virginia; Peter Youngs, University of Virginia; Daniel W. Player, University of Virginia

This study sets out to create a better understanding of early career teacher career decisions with special attention to the roles of the principal, teacher t, and the impact of lling a position that is dif cult- or easy-to- ll at a school, regardless of a school’s “hard-to-staff” status. We utilize the Beginning Teacher Longitudinal Study, a nationally representative sample of approximately 1,700 beginning teachers over a 5-year period, to reach this greater understanding.

Job Satisfaction, Teacher Victimization, and Authoritarian Discipline. Ryan Kapa, Belinda G. Gimbert (Ohio State University)

This study examines the effect of teacher victimization and authoritarian discipline on
job satisfaction. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to explore the relationship among these variables. Results show that teachers experiencing threats or attacks from students are less likely to rate their job satisfaction highly. The authoritarian discipline style is positively associated with reporting high job satisfaction. Administrators should be aware of the effects of consistent rule enforcement and teacher victimization on job satisfaction.

Re-Envisioning Teacher Leadership to Improve School Working Conditions: Implications for School Governance and Teacher Retention. Sara Kemper, University of Minnesota

Education leaders and researchers have long called attention to high rates teacher turnover in U.S. public schools. Teacher leadership opportunities have been suggested by previous research to play an important role in teacher satisfaction and retention. This paper integrates research on teacher leadership, working conditions, and retention and satisfaction
to arrive at a reconceptualization of teacher leadership as legitimate participation in school governance and to frame future research and interventions aimed at addressing teacher turnover.



Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

4:20pm

Social Identity and Leader Resilience in Challenging Contexts
Participants:

“Playing in Different Ends of the Sandbox”: Social Identity and Relationships at Co-Located School Sites. Alice Huguet, Northwestern University

Urban districts today face a growing challenge: school site co-location. Co-locations often result in conflict, but there is also potential for positive, collaborative interschool relationships at shared sites. Through application of social identity theory in multiple case study analyses, I investigate interactions between schools at three co-located sites. Findings suggest identity plays a role in interschool relationships, and mediators such as superordinate identities, shared goals, and communicative leadership may improve interschool interactions.

A Stranger in a Strange Land: A School Principal in Transition. Amy Serafini, University of Texas at El Paso

Despite the significant challenges of serving as an instructional leader, many principals and school leaders enter educational leadership PhD and EdD programs to advance their professional knowledge, expand their careers, or change career tracks into academia. The purpose of this study is to explore how one female principal along the U.S.-Mexico border personally and professionally changed as a result of her engagement in an education doctorate program in educational leadership

Resilience and the Leader (How Conceptual Models on Resilience Help Me as an Educational Leader). Janet Ledesma, Andrews University

This paper will discuss how principals can be resilient in the midst of their complex roles. Through a thorough discussion on the conceptual frameworks and research models on resilience theory, the topic will be explored. Resilience is defined as the ability to bounce back from adversity, essential for the effective principal. The literature will demonstrate a direct relationship between the stress of the principalship and the ability to maintain resilience during prolonged contact with adversity.

“I’m Exhausted, it Never Stops”: Principals, Vulnerable Students, and Compassion Fatigue in Challenging School Contexts. David DeMatthews, Elena Izquierdo, Paul Carrola (University of Texas at El Paso)

The purpose of this study is to explore how principals interact with their most vulnerable students and whether or not these interactions cause emotional burnout and compassion fatigue. We use a qualitative multicase study approach to explore how four principals working in elementary schools situated in high poverty communities and serving a high proportion of English language learners along the U.S.-Mexico border support their most vulnerable students.

Leadership Fatigue and the Costs Associated With Turnaround School Reform Efforts. Katie Elizabeth Nuss, University of Louisville; Bradley W. Carpenter, University of Houston

The purpose of this study is to understand the resulting psychological, emotional, and professional fatigue associated with teaching and leading (Papastylianou et al., 2009) within the context of a PLA school. First, we highlight the emotional and physical demands of working in such schools by examining the lived experiences of teachers and leaders embedded in this context. Second, we use role theory to gain a theoretical understanding of practitioners’ conflicts, fatigue, and stress (Biddle, 1986).



Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

4:20pm

Student Leadership and Voice
Participants:

An Examination of Student Voice and Leadership in a Study on Early College High Schools Principals. Hattie Lee Hammonds, Clemson University

This paper examines the role student voice played in a study on three principals at schools that participate in the early college high school initiative. Descriptions of each school and principal will be included. Additionally, democratic leadership (Dewey, 1916; Rusch, 1995), social justice leadership (Brown, 2006; Freire, 1970) and distributed leadership (Mayrowetz, 2008; Robinson, 2009; Spillane 2006) provide conceptual lenses for the study.

Deepening Our Understanding of the Student Voices in Educational Leadership: The Case of RunDSM. Kristopher Rollins, Des Moines Public Schools; Emily Lang, Des Moines Public Schools; Jason Deric Salisbury, Iowa State University; Daniel D. Spikes, Iowa State University

This qualitative research presents a study of a program designed to bring the voices of students from the margins to the center of school improvement processes. Findings highlight the ways students and their voices were positioned as leaders across multiple spaces; the leadership activities engaged in to create spaces for students’ voices to be legitimized; and the ways teacher leaders incorporated aspects of socially just leadership, critical pedagogy, and urban arts education into the program.

Explaining the Growing Importance of Student Perspectives. Joseph Murphy, Vanderbilt University

The question we address is what can account for the increased attention to student perspectives in education over the last two decades? “Why in the present climate is pupil perspective gaining ground in schools?” (Rudduck & Flutter, 2004, p. 100). One line of explanation explores shifts in the larger social forces that envelop schools. The second focuses on the changing dynamics of schooling. I examine these two forces herein.

Practices of Youth Leadership Development in Rural High School Context: Findings From a Qualitative Secondary Analysis. Victoria Sherif, University of Kentucky

This study elevates youth voices in proposing educational practices and forms of leadership development within rural youth. A secondary analysis of qualitative data collected as part of a 2-year case study explores youth perspectives on speci cities of education designed to further leadership in rural high school settings. This article serves as a foundation for rural high school principals to foster a sense of community among youth leaders and school administration.

Raising Rosa Parks: Systemic Student Leadership Development for Racial Equity. Patrick A. Duffy, St. Paul Public Schools

The purpose of this 3-year critical ethnographic study was to examine school leaders’ perceptions of systemic antiracism as it related to student leadership development. This study addresses how antiracism was defined, conceptualized, and manifested as leaders struggled with the traditional paradigm of raising test scores rather than re-energizing efforts to raise racially conscious student leaders. Reframing racial equity leadership to center student development was challenged by leaders’ individual and collective racial identity development.




Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

4:20pm

Dissecting the Curriculum Vitae (CV) for Job Winning Success (bring copies of your CV!)
Are you headed to the academy? Then you will need a CV. The CV is not a resume. It is a professional biography and a tool to market who you are to job seekers. Getting expert advice in creating a CV might be the difference between receiving that "Thank you for applying...but" message or that hoped for "Congratulations..." letter. Led by former job search committee faculty members, this session will dissect each section of the CV, provide attendees with do and don't tips for each, highlight CV formats, and offer recommendations on getting started. All the tips for creating that job winning CV is in this session!


Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B

4:20pm

Improving Educational Leadership Preparation with the INSPIRE 360
High quality leadership is essential in developing highly capable and knowledgeable educational leaders. In this session, participants will share 1) an analysis of data from the INSPIRE program and graduate surveys using a structural equation model that assesses the relationships among educational leadership preparation program quality and graduate learning outcomes; and 2) a set of resources that support the of INSPIRE data for program improvement and accreditation.


Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

4:20pm

Revitalizing the PK in PK-12: Ensuring Young Students' Success in Complex Contexts
Given the first years of life’s rapid brain development, toxic stressors, such as poor water, food, or healthcare quality, has a lasting negative impact on children’s success. Thus, early childhood education (ECE) plays a role in providing critical learning experiences. Rarely are school leaders prepared for ECE. Using state and local perspectives, we offer recommendations about school leaders’ roles in ECE to address core knowledge and standards along with raising research questions about that role.

Session Participants
avatar for Lu Young

Lu Young

Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Kentucky
Retired from P12 education in KY after 31 1/2 years; 9 years as superintendent of Jessamine County Schools. Currently serving as Director of Next Generation Educational Partnerships, teaching principal preparation, and working with the Next Generation Leadership Academy. Areas of interest: superintendent prep, principal prep, leading for deeper learning


Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

4:20pm

Educational Leadership and Demographic Change: Diversity, Im/migration and Change from Cities Around the World
Given unprecedented demographic shits, immigration and migration throughout the world, it is imperative that educational leadership scholars begin to examine the ways that these dynamics influence schooling in general and leadership practice in particular. This symposium focuses on the way that immigration and migration influence leadership preparation, practice and policy in some of the world’s most dynamic cities. Sites in the session include: Los Angeles/Melbourne, Australia (comparative); Chicago; New York; Shanghai, and; Aotearoa New Zealand.
Participants:

School Leadership and Diversity: A Comparative Study of Melbourne and Los Angeles. Anthony H. Normore, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Leading Schools With Migrant Children in Shanghai: Policies, Practices and Prospects. Allan Walker, Education University of Hong Kong

An Unlikely Destination: Meeting the Educational Needs of Immigrant, Migrant and Refugee Children in the Suburbs of Chicago, IL. Marla Israel, Loyola University, Chicago

Against the Grain: Establishing School Leadership Opportunities for Immigrants of Colour in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Andres Santamaria, Auckland University of Technology; Lorri J. Santamaría, University of Auckland

New York, New York: Big City of Dreamers? Terri Nicol Watson, City College of New York, CUNY



Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

4:20pm

Meet the Editors of JCEL, JRLE and EAQ
This session provides UCEA Convention attendees with an opportunity to engage with the editorial teams of UCEA’s three peer reviewed journals: JCEL, JRLE and EAQ. The editors will provide an overview of each journal’s focus and upcoming special issues and offer insight to participants who are interested in submitting their work. Following general remarks, participants will have an opportunity to engage in small group discussions with the three editorial teams.


Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cabot

4:20pm

White Privilege and Educational Leadership: Interrogating Racial Power and Privilege in Practice and Scholarship
Scholars and school leaders have widely condemned the negative influence of racism in American schools and society. That said, the concept of white privilege is poorly understood and contentious. The purpose of this symposium is to present a multi-faceted and deep exploration of the various ways that educational leadership is influenced by white privilege. Participants:

White Privilege and Educational Leadership: Interrogating Research and Policy Related to Preparation and Practice. Jeffrey S. Brooks, Monash University

White Privilege in the American Schoolhouse. Jessica Schwartzer, George Mason University; Sonya Douglass Horsford, Teachers College, Columbia University

Whiteness as Policy: Reconstructing Racial Privilege Through School Choice. Sarah Diem, Andrea Hawkman (University of Missouri)

Using Toulmin’s Model and Racecraft to Unpack Asian American Model Minority Sophistry. Nicholas Daniel Hartlep, Illinois State University

A Photovoice Study on the Expectations and Resiliencies of First-Generation Latina College Students. Lindsay Romasanta, University of California, San Diego; Daniel D. Liou, Arizona State University

Black Women Administrators and Faculty in the 21st Century University. Gaëtane Jean-Marie, University of Northern Iowa




Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

4:20pm

UCEA Film Festival I
Join us for a selection of the 2016 Film Festival Winners. Sit back and enjoy these 5 minute films. Session will include a Q&A with the filmmakers. The following films will be shown:
  • Leadership Induction Program: Leading as Learners (Vanderbilt University)
  • Improving School Leadership, One Story at a Time (East Carolina University)
  • Urban School Leadership Collaborative: Graduate Voices (University of Texas at San Antonio)
  • Balanced Education: A Partnership for Change (Florida Atlantic University)
  • Leadership Development (Baker College, University of Toledo and NCPEA)
  • P.O.S.T. Chile (Texas State University)

Moderators
avatar for Julia Ballenger

Julia Ballenger

Doctoral Faculty, TAMUC

Session Participants

Friday November 18, 2016 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Columbus

5:40pm

Armando Puentes/Building Bridges: A conversation among Latina/o School Leaders & Scholars
The Latino community is experiencing rapid population growth, yet continues to be under-represented at all levels of higher education. Latinos comprise 5.8% of K12 educational administrators and approximately 3% of the total faculty population. This has implications for K12 Latino leaders and faculty. Therefore, Latino leaders and scholars face similar challenges. The purpose of this proposal is to explore the parallels between Latino leaders and scholars experiences and to create a vehicle of continued conversation.


Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule B

5:40pm

Clinical Scholarship: Re-Envisioning and Revitalizing Collegial Leadership through Equity Advisory Teams
Education leaders are guiding increasingly diverse schools in interculturally tense times. Engaging in “advisory teams” with colleagues committed to social justice can provide support to confidently cultivate inclusive organizations. Using the work of Randall Lindsey et al. and Mitchell Hammer, attendees will participate in a Critical Conversation using Equity Advisory Team structures and contemplate their own orientations toward difference, share intercultural challenges they are experiencing, and consider approaches to profoundly address historically intractable issues.


Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 4 - Cartier

5:40pm

How Shall We Study School District Central Offices? The Case for Design-based Systems Leadership Research
School district central offices are trying to lead for districtwide instructional improve¬ment, but finding few supports for that work. This “critical conversation” examines this challenge and one promising future direction: design-based systems leadership research (DBSLR). A form of design-based research, DBSLR involves researchers and practitioners together creating central office change strategies that reflect and innovate beyond the latest knowledge in the field. Unlike traditional design methods, DBSLR addresses the particular complexities of systems leadership contexts.


Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth B

5:40pm

Theorizing Educational Leadership in Communities of Color
This proposed critical conversation engages the audience in a consideration of the multiple roles and identities of K-12 leaders of color. The presenters will interrogate notions of leadership development and praxis that emerge when leaders of color take the helm in environments that mirror their personal histories and experiences with marginalization. By exploring the complexities of leadership, we seek to reveal and interrogate paradoxes that arise in the pursuits of success among students/families of color.


Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Duluth A

5:40pm

“Revitalizing Educational Leadership: Intersectionality and Issues of Access, Multiple Identities, and Deaf Education”
In academe, a disconnect exists between hearing and Deaf scholars. Humphries created the term “audism” to label the discriminatory treatment of Deaf individuals (Bauman, 2008). Knowledge of Deaf epistemologies is critical for the hearing society to understand Deaf people, their way of being, language, and d/Deaf culture/history. The purpose of the critical conversation is to raise consciousness regarding the conditions that Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing students and faculty face in the current sociopolitical and academic context.


Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Nicolet B

5:40pm

Data, Research and Publishing in Educational Leadership
Participants:

Interweaving Research With Practice: Negotiating Concurrent Roles as Researcher and Subject. Jean Mrachko, University of Michigan

I will share my experience negotiating the concurrent roles of researcher and subject and interweaving research with practice. While conducting a case study within a large-scale instructional improvement initiative, I held the unique position of both investigator of and contributor to the initiative’s continuous improvement process. I raise questions about the bene ts and challenges of engaging in research in this intimate way, exposing how my dual roles simultaneously wrinkled and smoothed the research process.

Data Driven Decisions: Using Equity Theory to Highlight Implications for Underserved Students. Kelly Brown, Prairie View A&M University; Denver Jade Fowler, University of Mississippi

By using equity theory through a social justice lens, we highlight how data are currently being used to solve the what and not the why as it relates to achievement gaps for marginalized students. School practitioners have been utilizing quantitative data to determine the academic levels of students. While this information is useful, it may not accurately reflect the holistic picture of a student’s social, emotional, and cultural needs.

Perceptions of Educational Leadership Faculty of Open Access Publishing. Jayson W. Richardson, University of Kentucky; Scott Christopher McLeod, University of Colorado-Denver; Todd Hurst, University of Kentucky

This study focuses on understanding perceptions about publishing in open access journals. The results from a sample of 172 UCEA members include perceptions of pay-to-publish models, perceptions of open access publishing, differences between publishing work in open access journals compared to traditional subscription-based journals, likelihood of publishing in open access journals, institutional perceptions of open access publishing, and perceptions from one’s peers in the field of publishing in open access journals.

Using the Research Skill Development (RSD) Framework to Teach Research in Practitioner Programs. Tara L. Shepperson, Eastern Kentucky University; Jessica Hearn, University of Kentucky

In practitioner programs, students bene t from academic training that diagnoses and develops research skills to inquire and solve problems of practice. The RSD framework was used in research and writing courses to scaffold progression from instructor-led to student-directed learning. Re ections and assessments (instructor and student) suggest this and similar frameworks can guide course and program curriculum so that research skills and habits of mind transfer to practical real-world applications.

The Nature and Role of Quantifying Qualitative Data: An Ignite Session. Kathryn N. Hayes, California State University, East Bay

Recently there have been calls for more systematic quantification of qualitative data. However, the nature of salient constructs (climate, etc.) and contextual nature of educational leadership research beg two questions: First, what are the available “quanti cation” tools to create explanatory models of complex contexualized phenomena? Second, does such quantification of qualitative data violate the boundaries of epistemological assumptions, and if so, in what ways?




Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard A

5:40pm

Innovations in Leadership Preparation
Participants:
Clinical Scholarship: Clinical Experiences for Re-Envisioned Leadership. Lynn Wheeler, John W. Somers (University of Indianapolis)

Our Ignite presentation will describe a university’s strategic planning to restructure clinical/internship experiences to cultivate transformative leadership skills and enhance the rigor of assignments as well as the definition of candidate success. A core component of the new eld work includes the use of high-quality building-level mentors supervising and assessing authentic experiences. Candidate data from five cohort groups and a qualitative survey of 50 mentors will be shared.

Avatars, Interactors, and Coaching Feedback: Master’s Degree Candidates’ Perception of Effectiveness of Mixed Reality Experiences. Rosemarye Taylor, Hilary Buckridge (University of Central Florida)

The purpose is to provide insight into how this mixed reality technology using avatars managed in real time by interactors has been employed in one MEd in Educational Leadership program from Fall 2013 through Spring 2015. Candidates’ (N = 141) perspectives gathered through quantitative and qualitative measures on virtual rehearsal in a mixed reality environment and coaching feedback, both immediately after the practice and months later at the completion of the administrative internship, will be explored.

Leadership Development Ecological Framework. Karen L. Sanzo, Old Dominion University

Leadership preparation and development research has been primarily bifurcated in its approach: (a) research on and practical application of leadership preparation for aspiring leaders who are seeking credentialing and (b) research and practical application of postcredential development programs that are traditionally district based and focused on supporting current school leaders. This Ignite session will present a conceptual framework around an ecological approach to leadership development that blends the two.

Re-Envisioning Leadership Training in Indian Education Settings Through University Partnerships. Alex Red Corn, Kansas State University

American Indian education environments are highly unique sociocultural and political settings, and the leadership knowledge and skills needed in these settings are often absent in traditional educational leadership training programs. This presentation aims to discuss how creating university partnerships with tribal communities may provide a more appropriate preparation program for educational leaders who plan to practice in these settings, and how university partnerships may also help ll similar needs in other unique settings.

Theoretical Considerations and Practical Strategies for Teaching Practitioner-Scholars in EdD Programs. Katherine Cumings Mans eld, Virginia Commonwealth University; Jaime Stacy, Henrico County Public Schools

The purpose of this Ignite presentation is to spark interest and awareness around theoretical and practical elements that we have found essential in our work teaching practicing educational leaders. First, we share the literature that makes important distinctions between pedagogy and andragogy. Then, we share what we have learned from the literature (and our on-the-ground experiences) concerning the strengths and weaknesses of using the team-teaching model.



Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Richard B

5:40pm

Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Evaluating Educational Leadership Preparation Programs
This session focuses on current trends in the evaluation of educational leadership preparation programs. Presenters will share insight into the growth of programs and degree production and make a case for quality preparation program evaluation. Subsequently, participants will share examples of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to evaluating educational leadership preparation, while highlighting the pros and cons of each approach.
Participants:

Trends in the Preparation of Educational Leaders. Frank Perrone, UCEA/University of Virginia

Deep Program Reviews, the UCEA Way. Pamela D. Tucker, University of Virginia

Data Dashboards: What They Can and Cannot Reveal About Quality Preparation. Gina Ikemoto, New Leaders

The SLLA as a Data Point: More Harm Than Good? Jason A. Grissom, Vanderbilt University

Providing Guidance to States on the Interpretation of Program Evaluation Data. Ed Fuller, Pennsylvania State University




Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle A

5:40pm

Revitalizing Communities and Schools: Stories of Uniting the Power of Place and Wisdom of People
The purpose of this innovative session is to explore a shift in consciousness. More specifically, this learning exchange will begin by mapping how Reframing Community Partnerships in Education has been applied in a number of schools and communities. The session will then open space for everyone participating to unleash their imaginations and marshal story, theory, and reflection in order to revitalize and transform themselves, their schools, and their communities.


Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet A

5:40pm

Critical and Historical Policy Analysis in Education
Participants:

Organizing With and Against Policy: Crafting Coherence Across Institutional Logics. Rodney S. Whiteman, Indiana University

This paper is an ethnographic empirical investigation into ways teachers of a small, newly formed private school navigate a policy context in which school accountability and choice policies may be seen as conflicting. Using the institutional logics perspective, I explore ways various logics are used to craft coherence of a complex policy context.

Performing Equity: An Analysis of the Equitable Access to Excellent Educators Initiative. Andrene Castro, University of Texas at Austin

In 2014, the U.S. Department of Education enacted Equitable Access to Excellent Educators, a policy initiative that ensures all children have equitable access to high- quality, excellent teaching. This study attempts to problematize notions of teacher equity by examining localized responses to state equity plans. As such, this research aims to unpack the cultural politics of how equity is defined and performed across the federal, state, and local landscape.

Revisiting and Extending the Work of Cowen and Fowles: A Historical Analysis of Kentucky Teacher Contracts. W. Kyle Ingle, Richard Aaron Wisman (University of Louisville)

Informed by Cowen and Fowles (2013), the authors use New Institutionalism in their historical analysis of teacher contracts over time from the nine Kentucky school districts that negotiate teacher contracts. Have these provisions changed (or not) over time in the face of state and federal education reform efforts? The study provides further evidence that federal and state policies have limited effect on negotiated provisions at the district level.




Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Brule A

5:40pm

Race, Vouchers, and School Integration
Participants:

Race and School Vouchers: Legal, Historical, and Political Contexts. Mark Anthony Gooden, University of Texas at Austin; Mario S. Torres, Texas A&M University; Huriya Jabbar, University of Texas at Austin

This article investigates legal and political issues as they relate to school vouchers serving students of color. Specifically, we draw on the empirical, historical, and legal research to examine whether school vouchers will create a more equitable system of education for poor students of color.

A Federal Lever for School Integration: New Opportunities and Challenges for Magnet Schools. Genevieve P. Siegel-Hawley, Virginia Commonwealth University; Erica Frankenberg, Pennsylvania State University; Rachel Anne Levy, Virginia Commonwealth University; Jennifer Ayscue, University of California, Los Angeles

In 2010, new legal restrictions prompted the federal government to amend regulations to provide greater exibility to school districts applying for the Magnet Schools Assistance Program grant. Districts were no longer required to use binary racial classi cations and could create schools that resulted in minority group enrollments exceeding the district-wide average. This paper explores how 2010 and 2013 grantees applied the regulations, especially with regard to de ning and reducing minority group isolation.

Examining Equity Implications of Local Response to Federal Limits on Diversity: Louisville, Kentucky’s Integration Policy. Erica Frankenberg, Pennsylvania State University

By providing an in-depth analysis to understand the diversity and equity of JCPS’s new controlled choice plan, this study deepens our understanding of dimensions that are critical for assessing the viability of such plans: whether it equitably offers choices to students and whether the choices granted affect student enrollment. This analysis of student-level data suggests that the policy grants certain subgroups their first choice of school more frequently, which affects subsequent district enrollment.



Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - Joliet B

5:40pm

Finding and Maintaining Balance in Graduate School
Graduate school can be a really exciting time in your life; but it can also be stressful. Do you find yourself, and everyone around you, anxious? Or do you sometimes feel that the pressures you feel are intense and the deadlines unreasonable? Many of us feel guilty for taking time away from our graduate work or sometimes we find ourselves in situations where we are up at all hours of the night, like when your computer suddenly decided to stage a revolt the day before your abstract for a major conference is due. How does one stay grounded and “sane” in these situations and, more generally, in graduate school? How does one ensure a healthy, optimal graduate school-life balance? This is a time to hear from successful scholars who have some tips, tricks and advice on who to maintain this balance.


Friday November 18, 2016 5:40pm - 6:50pm
Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center: Floor 5 - La Salle B